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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know these questions are asked a million times, and I've seen the answer around here before, but right now I just can't seem to find it.

I designed a shirt a while ago based on a city skyline (VERY generic). I don't even know what city it is (I think it's New York), and I have NO idea where I got the photo from.. All I know is that I found something on Google images when I originally designed the shirt, placed it into Illustrator, used Live Trace to create a vector image, and altered a few things here and there to make it work with the shirt. Now I can't even find the same image on Google Images if I try (and I have tried...)!

1) How far do copyright limits go? I know it's illegal to use somebody else's photograph without permission, but isn't there something about altering the image to a point where the copyright no longer applies?

2) With something as generic as this (and altered at that), what are the chances that I'll actually get into any kind of trouble for this? I'm thinkin slim to none.

I just wanna play it safe. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Im not able to answer your question directly, however-Future note: have you tried googling 'royalty free images'. Those are free and legal to use. Maybe on your next tshirt adventure-check those out!!
Ohh now that's a good idea - I never even thought about that. Thanks for the tip!:)
 

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isn't there something about altering the image to a point where the copyright no longer applies?
No, there isn't - that's just a myth.

With something as generic as this (and altered at that), what are the chances that I'll actually get into any kind of trouble for this? I'm thinkin slim to none.
Realistically? Yeah, very slim. On the other hand, as generic as a skyline might seem, there probably aren't many photographers who've actually taken that photo (since it probably required a helicopter). Sometimes things can be surprisingly identifiable. Still... it's a natural feature of a well documented landscape. Depending on what you've done with it, it would be hard to claim a moral issue here.
 
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