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I have recently been using my Epson C120 w/Durabrite Inks, and the JPSS paper. When printed the images appear to come out correctly, but once pressed the color becomes dull, no vibrancy at all :confused:....I have read SEVERAL threads here, regarding Durabrite inks, adjusting color settings (which I did), and the color shifting issue....but I have also read threads of ppl who have used this ink with great success....I have tried everything, any suggestions on what I may be doing wrong?? I am pressing for the suggested time and temp....Should I change my inks? I have read great things about Everlast and Magic Mix...any help will be greatly appreciated...
 

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This was found in the link provided, maybe you're experiencing it?

"The thing I find with 100% cotton is, after rigorous test washes like this, it experiences what I call "fiber lift". It is tiny threads of cotton that lift and give the shirt the appearance of a light fade, tho it is not faded, it is only the richness of the cotton lifting. I've heard this can be corrected by re-pressing a shirt, but I'm not going to sell them to a customer and give them that advice. I just stick with the 50/50's and avoid it all together."

What are you printing on? 100% Cotton Tees?
 

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If that's the case, look up the thread on cold peeling. I believe what you do is you press the t-shirt with the teflon paper, you let it cool, stretch it, and then you repress it for 6-8 seconds with parchment paper, stretch, cool, and peel. I think I got this right, but I'm sure Kelly will be along some time soon to correct me. ;)
 

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If that's the case, look up the thread on cold peeling. I believe what you do is you press the t-shirt with the teflon paper, you let it cool, stretch it, and then you repress it for 6-8 seconds with parchment paper, stretch, cool, and peel. I think I got this right, but I'm sure Kelly will be along some time soon to correct me. ;)
Yes I am using 100% cotton Gildan shirts....so you're thinking the cold peel technique may help?
 

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I will definitely re-read those threads and give the cold peel method a try...thanks for all your replies..I would be eager to see if anyone else has a suggestion as well??
 

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Yea I really am not the best person to answer all these questions for you, but I have been doing a lot of research on this information and started saving threads pertaining to it. I purchased a c120 and some JPSS paper, now all I need is a press! I'm also thinking about getting refillable cartridges once I get some practice under my belt. Check out those threads, I'm sure you'll find all the answers you're looking for.
 

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I have recently been using my Epson C120 w/Durabrite Inks, and the JPSS paper. When printed the images appear to come out correctly, but once pressed the color becomes dull, no vibrancy at all :confused:....I have read SEVERAL threads here, regarding Durabrite inks, adjusting color settings (which I did), and the color shifting issue....but I have also read threads of ppl who have used this ink with great success....I have tried everything, any suggestions on what I may be doing wrong?? I am pressing for the suggested time and temp....
Hi Tasha,

I use Durabrite ink. I have noticed sometimes - depending on the image - I need to try to give it a little extra "punch" to liven it up. Is that kind of how you would describe it?

What settings are you using on your printer?

I print on the c88+ with these settings:

text mode
cyan+5
Magenta +5
Yellow - 10 to -20

but then there are the other settings:
saturation (alot of saturation is not good for transfers, less ink is better.)

*contrast
*brightness

I mess around with contrast and bright to deepen the darker colors and to get them to stand out next to the lighter colors. Does this sound like what you want to do?

If yes, you can print some test samples to see what the image looks like. The problem is - is that is going to burn up some transfer paper.

I tried to print samples on plain white paper to save my JPSS, but what printed on plain paper didn't print on jpss, so I ended up wasting ink and having to print samples on JPSS anyway. To conserve ink and paper, I printed the samples as 3x5" instead of full size images.

I also cut my JPSS in half, and used half sheets. I would print a 3x5 sample, and if it wasn't rich enough, I would re-do the settings and turn the paper 180* (so the first image was now upside down) and I would print the next sample. It wasn't a perfect plan, but it cut down on my waste. :rolleyes:

Should I change my inks? I have read great things about Everlast and Magic Mix...any help will be greatly appreciated...
Sometimes this is easiest if you are having trouble with Durabrite. I am one of the lucky few that have had great results, but when I read the threads I sometimes feel like I'm in the minority.

The last thread Spank gave you about durabright you are fired shows the supplier alot of people use, there are others to use as well, but alot of folks use that system and seem happy.

If you can adjust the bright and contrast and get what you are looking for, you'll be alright with Durabrite, outside of the big expense to stay with Epson carts. That is the most expensive ink option out there.

Good luck to you...
 

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I also cut my JPSS in half, and used half sheets. I would print a 3x5 sample, and if it wasn't rich enough, I would re-do the settings and turn the paper 180* (so the first image was now upside down) and I would print the next sample. It wasn't a perfect plan, but it cut down on my waste. :rolleyes:
I'm glad you said this, I was just wondering to myself the other day of ways I could save on using transfer paper, like ganging images together on one sheet. My other idea was to maybe cut the sheets smaller for smaller images like logos and whatnot, and feed them through the envelope feeder. This works?
 

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Hi Kelly,
Thanks for taking the time to respond...I have tried various settings:

photo mode (I always use this, I haven't tried any of the others)
cyan+5 to +10
Magenta +5 to +10
Yellow - 15 to -25

I have only adjusted the contrast no more than +5 or so, b/c I read that by doing that it tends to lay down too much ink...I haven't adjusted the brightness level though....I can try playing around with the brightness/contrast levels again...what do you suggest +10 or so? The idea of cutting the transfers and doing different tests is awesome....thanks again kelly....
 

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If that's the case, look up the thread on cold peeling. I believe what you do is you press the t-shirt with the teflon paper, you let it cool, stretch it, and then you repress it for 6-8 seconds with parchment paper, stretch, cool, and peel.
Cold peel will CRACK if you don't re-heat the transfer a second time. Good job, Spank, I see you have the re-heat in the instructions. I don't know if 6-8 seconds is long enough on a cold peel. I'll go get Rhonda's thread for reference since cold peel is mentioned here.

http://www.t-shirtforums.com/heat-press-heat-transfers/t56833.html

It's important to stress the second RE-HEAT or the shirt will likely fail on the first wash.

spankthafunk said:
I think I got this right, but I'm sure Kelly will be along some time soon to correct me. ;)
Haha, man, is that a good thing? You did a great job, Spank! The second heating is in there, muy importante! :)


tasha said:
Yes I am using 100% cotton Gildan shirts....so you're thinking the cold peel technique may help?
The cold peel (with a second heating :)) that folks are trying out is to get the JPSS to have a smoother hand/feel on the shirt. It doesn't seem to affect dullness or brightness. The original finish of JPSS after the hot peel is slightly gritty, and some folks are trying to get that flat. They have found a cold peel does this, but they also found shirts that are cold peeled crack in the wash (cold wash).

Rhonda has discovered by heating the shirt a second time, she was able to wash it without cracking. She may have cracked the case on cold peel. :D

If you want to cold peel, please read Rhonda's thread to fully understand what makes it work and what makes it fail.


I've read that thread, but I don't seem to notice anyone there using the JPSS and Durabrite inks...the original poster seems to use Canon,
The first shirt in the thread, the Virgo, I printed with Canon regular dye ink.

The second shirt in the thread, the Car Deal Connection shirt, I printed with Durabrite pigment ink from my c88+. Folks were asking if Durabrite and JPSS hold up under bleach, so I bleached that one, too. So that shirt is the Durabrite and JPSS.

tasha said:
and others mentioned heat transfer ink, which leads me to believe it has something to do with the type of ink I am using? I'm not sure....:(
spankthafunk said:
Well it shouldn't be the ink because plenty of posters have used Durabrite Inks and have had no problems.
That's the funny thing with Durabrite ink, and it seems to be the ink I read about most that acts different for different people.

If you ask Melissa/AngelicEndevors (who wrote the durabrite you are fired thread) she detests Durabrite ink from what she went thru with it, yet I haven't had one issue yet.

But Tasha, if you don't already want to change inks for the sake of changing (cost, color, whatever the reason) maybe those contrast & bright settings will be enough for what you want to do.


spankthafunk said:
Yea I really am not the best person to answer all these questions for you, but I have been doing a lot of research on this information and started saving threads pertaining to it.
He sure has been researching!!! And you did a great job, Spank! All that reading has paid off, and shows. Once you get a press in your hands, you'll be pressing shirts from minute #1 -- you've got it all down pat. Great job!


Okay, hope this helps out, most of this was going a-ok, but I wanted to add a little bit that wasn't yet here. Have a great day, all and I hope it works out for you, Tasha. :)
 

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I have only adjusted the contrast no more than +5 or so, b/c I read that by doing that it tends to lay down too much ink...
You are right, too much ink is not good. That is partly why I use text mode and have experimented with the saturation in the settings, as well.

For different images I have, I use different settings, so once I find the right settings, I write them down.

Here are some sample settings for my c88+:

For one image, I used -3 bright, then +3 contrast, and 0 saturation.

For another I used +0 B, then +2 C, and 0 saturation.

For another I used -3 B, then +3 C, and +3 saturation.

So I found with that third one, adding saturation (yes, it was scary, lol) but it helped get the kick I needed. I have *never* had bleeding issues on my shirts, so it was okay for me on that setting. But with "text" mode, I am already using *less ink* than in "photo" mode.

I found reducing the bright while adding contrast seemed to work the best for me.

Hope these help. Let me know how you make out if you get a chance, okay? Have a nice day. :)
 

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ahhhh thanks Kelly, I was getting tired of driving the carriage and was hopin you would come along and take the reins for me. Great explanations, and an example of why you won the contest! ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks so much Kelly! This has been a big help...I will try again, using the advice you all have given me, and give an update....thanks again :)
 

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update...I think I may have found the culprit!! :) Now grant it I am still doing some testing, adjusting the color settings, etc.....BUT I believe the issue (or at least part of it) was the actual shirt...On all the tests I've done so far, it has been on a 100% cotton tee, I have gotten better results with adjusting the color settings, but it still wasn't what I wanted.....my very last test this evening was done on a 50/50 white tee...total difference in appearance! The colors seem to "pop" so much more :).....anyone else experience this?? or maybe its all in my head....lol :rolleyes:
 

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Not in your head at all! hehe, the first post in this thread from me mentioned what might be the cause, which came from Kelly in another post (she states she likes using 50/50 blends):

"The thing I find with 100% cotton is, after rigorous test washes like this, it experiences what I call "fiber lift". It is tiny threads of cotton that lift and give the shirt the appearance of a light fade, tho it is not faded, it is only the richness of the cotton lifting. I've heard this can be corrected by re-pressing a shirt, but I'm not going to sell them to a customer and give them that advice. I just stick with the 50/50's and avoid it all together."
 

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awesome, I am definitely noticing a difference with the change in shirts.....thanks for all your help
 

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I think the largest difference is how you design or save your images for printing. Are you working in CMYK or RGB? Dull images can be influenced by the actual color mode and file type and the printer settings. Adding contrast will enhance the difference between the darkest tones and the lightest tones. Easily seen on a grayscale image. Brightness will either create a lighter whitening haze or a dull darkening gray.

I do agree with reducing the printer colors for the yellow tones as they can be problematic with durabrite inks. Exactly why many folks have moved over to the HT pigment inks.
 

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