T-Shirt Forums banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi
I am just starting to look into how to start a t-shirt business. Any suggestions would be great. Is there any books out there that explaines the process? I need a good how to book or info. Well just wanted to say hi and thanks everyone for all the info i have read so far.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Hey Jeff,
What type of t-shirt business? Your own line or a shop that prints shirts for schools, businesses, sport teams, etc?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,970 Posts
Welcome!

There are dozens of books, but for different areas. I doubt you'll find a good "How to Create a Tshirt Business 101" of any note though.

But there are great books on e-commernce/market/printing etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
A shop that sell to schools and sports teams. The idea comes from the fact that my daughter owns an All-Star competitive cheer team and I see how much they spend on shirts, uniforms, ect. I am looking to start small but want to buy equipment that can grow with the business. My question to anyone who has gone through this is. If you were starting a new business what type of equipment would buy? I see package deals on some web sites but I do not know if this is what I need.
Thanks
Jeff
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,512 Posts
jhughes656 said:
I am looking to start small but want to buy equipment that can grow with the business. [...] I see package deals on some web sites but I do not know if this is what I need.
Package deals can be good - everything you need in one place, sometimes at a cheaper price. Obviously not all packages are created equal - sometimes the equipment isn't any good, or it's bundled with stuff you don't actually need that just ends up costing you money. But in theory the right package is waiting out there for any given startup.

However, I don't really see package deals as the kind of equipment that grows with a business. They're normally "complete kits" that give you low end equipment - the bare minimum to get by. Sometimes people want to get something they can easily afford at the time, and are happy to replace the equipment as they expand. If you want equipment that grows with a business though, you generally need more professional equipment - something that exceeds your current needs. You may find that in a package, but it's a lot less likely.

The advantage of buying the bare minimum is that you haven't spent more than you have to if the business fails, and if things take off you can afford to replace it. It is essentially a waste of money if you end up replacing it sooner rather than later though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,766 Posts
We are your book. My suggestion is use screen printed transfers with Plastisol for some work and heat transfers for others. Unless you have the training to do screen printing then you may want to think differently. If your going to do this the right way and your just starting out I would suggest this route. Screen printing equipment is expensive compared to heat transfers and heat transfers with plastisol. I am doing a school right now and using both. You can not tell the difference between my plastisol transfers and screen printed shirts. Look at www.first-edition.com
Lou
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Go up to the top left hand corner of this page and type in direct to garment in the search box. You should get enough info from this to help you determine if DTG is the way you want to go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,970 Posts
It's also important to consider the market you're trying to enter. If your doing novelty shirts, event shirts, etc, you can quite happily use dtg, heatpressing, or screenprinted transfers.

If you're entering the fashion industry (a la Threadless) I would advise against anything other than pure screenprinting (transfers are not good a solid blocks of colour...as is commonplace with spot fashion screenprinting....or thin lines)
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top