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Just starting out, and am currently using JetWear Greenline (hot peel) paper. I'm getting problems with not all of the ink peeling with the paper (sometimes), and some cracking and bleeding at times after washing. Have any of you used this paper? What has been your experience? I have VERY limited funds for my business startup, and can't afford to sample-around for paper. I chose this brand because the site I ordered it from seemed very knowledgable, and even published their paper testing process. Obviuosly, I want to put out the best quality tee that I can.

Just to let you know my process:

Print transfer onto greenline (hot peel) paper with an Epson Stylus Photo R200

Heat press is an older model 16X20 (I believe company is TLC, which I can't find) bought used. It looks to be much like the Hix HF5000 Clam Shell press, and has a thermometer and timer built in.

Clamping the press down with teflon between the bottom and top plattens for 60 seconds to heat up the bottom/teflon and allow better flash for the ink on the inside of the shirt.

Prepressing shirts for about 3 seconds

Using a teflon sheet between the bottom platten and the t-shirt (side that I'm pressing)

Pressing shirt for 20 seconds at 400 degrees (per paper instructios).

Peel immediately.

If anybody thinks I should switch paper, or change my process, please let me know. I'm brand new to all this, and need a boost in my learning curve. :)

Thanks,

Ron
www.tdoodles.com
 

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The jetwear paper is great. That is what I use. You'll have to just experiment different times and heats. On my heatpress I use 18 seconds at 385 degrees. I would estimate that it took me 20-30 messed up shirts before I figuired out the right time to use. Keep on experimenting, and you will get it right eventually.

From the process you described, I think that you are over heating the transfer. Try transfering without pre-heating up the bottom of the heat press. I have never preheated the bottom of the press, and wverything works fine for me.

Best luck,
Jon
 

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TDoodles said:
Print transfer onto greenline (hot peel) paper with an Epson Stylus Photo R200
What type of ink? Durabrite or something else?

TDoodles said:
Heat press is an older model 16X20 (I believe company is TLC, which I can't find) bought used. It looks to be much like the Hix HF5000 Clam Shell press, and has a thermometer and timer built in.
Type of press shouldn't make a huge difference; only problem there might be if it isn't heating evenly, an infrared thermometer could check that.

TDoodles said:
Clamping the press down with teflon between the bottom and top plattens for 60 seconds to heat up the bottom/teflon and allow better flash for the ink on the inside of the shirt.
This is a weird step, never heard of anyone doing this. You probably don't need to.

TDoodles said:
Prepressing shirts for about 3 seconds
Good, always important to pre-press to get the moisture and stuff out. You might even go a little longer here, like 5 seconds.

TDoodles said:
Using a teflon sheet between the bottom platten and the t-shirt (side that I'm pressing)
So you're pressing it with the transfer underneath the shirt? Also seems kind of a strange way to do it, but I guess it should probably work just as well as on top. You might consider buying a teflon pad, which attaches over the bottom platen (instead of having to put it there each time). You might try doing it right-side up (if I'm interpretting you correctly) and see if it makes a difference; I also imagine it'd be difficult to line up the transfer effectively with it upside-down.

TDoodles said:
If anybody thinks I should switch paper, or change my process, please let me know. I'm brand new to all this, and need a boost in my learning curve.
The paper that has come most recommended to me (and that I've doner several transfers with with no problems) is the Transjet II paper (aka Magic Jet). This paper barely leaves any hand at all after one wash and doesn't bleed at all if you're using pigmented inks (such as the OEM Durabrite inks or Magix Mix inks).
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Twinge said:
What type of ink? Durabrite or something else?


So you're pressing it with the transfer underneath the shirt? Also seems kind of a strange way to do it, but I guess it should probably work just as well as on top. You might consider buying a teflon pad, which attaches over the bottom platen (instead of having to put it there each time). You might try doing it right-side up (if I'm interpretting you correctly) and see if it makes a difference; I also imagine it'd be difficult to line up the transfer effectively with it upside-down.
Actually, no, I'm pressing from the top. Sorry, I didn't word that step very well. :) As far as the ink goes, I don't know. I'm using the cartridges that came with the printer, and found at Sams Club (T048120 Black, T048920 5 colors) I've looked on the packaging and the cartridges themselves, and nothing specifies the type of ink...just says Epson inks.

The bottom platen pre-heating was from instructions of a particular paper, and I thought it may help the bleeding problem (Sounded good at the time) :)
 

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The bleeding problem is almost definately your ink. Regular dye-based ink tends to bleed during the first wash, though I've heard this will wash out again and be fine from then on (haven't seen it personally). If you want to avoid bleeding, you'll want to get some kind of pigmented ink, which would either be Durabrite inks (from Epson, may not be available for your model) or Magic Mix inks (can be found here: http://personalizedsupplies.com/archivalinks.htm)
 

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Update...I got a response back from Epson, and unfortunately, my model printer will not support the Durabrite inks. :( The models that do use those inks are:

Epson Stylus C66
Epson Stylus C86
Epson Stylus CX4600 (All in one)
Epson Stylus CX6600 (All in one)

So, it looks like I'm going printer shopping again. *sigh* Does anyone have an educated opinion on which one I should get?
 

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You don't need to use ink refills when using Magic Mix; she sells pre-filled cartidges as well. I'd check with her to see if she can do pre-filled inks for your model before you buy a new printer... Otherwise, I'd try asking at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Heat_Transfers_For_Desktop_Printers/ to see what printers they can recommend (as they have more experience with different printers than I do by far).
 

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Twinge said:
You don't need to use ink refills when using Magic Mix; she sells pre-filled cartidges as well. I'd check with her to see if she can do pre-filled inks for your model before you buy a new printer... Otherwise, I'd try asking at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Heat_Transfers_For_Desktop_Printers/ to see what printers they can recommend (as they have more experience with different printers than I do by far).
I checked with the above link, and unfortunately, the printer (R200) is not compatible. I have purchased a C86 instead. Wish me luck. :)
 

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cindy said that they MAY have a compatible set of cartridges in about a month or so, but not for sure, so I opted for the new printer as I can't wait that long. I do plan to re-visit her site for the ink I need now. How do bulk ink systems work?
 

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Bulk Ink Systems basically replace all the catridges and are always hooked up; the systems themselves cost an initial investment, but then you can just buy ink and refill the system instead of buying the catridges, and that's a much cheaper route in the long run.
 
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