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Hi,

Has anyone here downloaded files form istockphotos with intentions of using/modifying images to t-shirt sales. If so, did you purchase an extened license policy? It is very confusing with the legal BS that they post.

Please Advise,

thanks!
CG
 

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Hi JP, I think if you contact istockphoto directly and ask them, they will be able to give you the best answer regarding your intended usage.
 

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ChinClothing said:
Also, if you change the graphic more than 25% you will be fine.
No, you will not. That does not even bear the slighest kernel of truth.
 

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No, you will not. That does not even bear the slighest kernel of truth.
It certainly does bear the "slightest kernel of truth." If someone puts a rectangle up on istock, and I modify it by deleting 1 of the 4 points, I'd like to see the owner of the art prosecute me for printing a triangle.

every infringement case is unique. Technically, it's not how much of a percentage you change the art, but whether the commercial value of the old art is being infringed on. There are also parody laws which can be considered.

99% of people never even bother to register their art with the Library of Congress. Try going to court to claim infringement without having your art registered, and you'll get a very expensive lesson in wasting a judges time.
 

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Seriously, though, Rodney's got the best answer. Either go right to the source and make sure you have proper permission before you do anything, or have your attorney review the legal documents from the website. Don't count on urban legend or wives' tales when it comes to legal matters. If you start with someone's existing (um, registered, like everything on that website is) art and make modifications, you still used intellectual property owned by someone else for commercial gain, and if you get sued the outcome is going to totally depend on who's lawyer can argue their client's side better.
 

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Also, if you change the graphic more than 25% you will be fine.
I'm always amused by those thinking there is some type of mathematical formula that applies to image manipulation in regards to copyright or trademark infringement.

As for istockphoto, you will need an extended license if you use the image for resale on a t-shirt.

The best way to do it is to download the image at the size you intend to use it and work your design and then market it. If the design doesn't sell, you of course don't need to purchase the extended rights. But if the design does sell, just redownload the image at the smallest size and add the extended license rights.

Oh, and by the way. You do not have to copyright your art work to claim copyright protection.
 

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It certainly does bear the "slightest kernel of truth." If someone puts a rectangle up on istock, and I modify it by deleting 1 of the 4 points, I'd like to see the owner of the art prosecute me for printing a triangle.

every infringement case is unique. Technically, it's not how much of a percentage you change the art, but whether the commercial value of the old art is being infringed on. There are also parody laws which can be considered.

99% of people never even bother to register their art with the Library of Congress. Try going to court to claim infringement without having your art registered, and you'll get a very expensive lesson in wasting a judges time.
You are totally incorrect about editing copywrited works. If you edit a copywrited image it makes it no more legal than if you didnt edit it but still used it. In fact editing it only makes it more evident that you intended to defraud the copywrite owner as you tried to manipulate the image to hide the fact you are infringing. Read the laws thuroughly :) Also as the pp stated, you do not have to have a copywrite on your image for it to be protected, you only have to show that you created it before the other person used it and therefore you establish ownership.
 
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If you read their extended license at istock, you can print the image so many times on retail items. I think it is 2000 times then you would need to renew the license. So you can use it, there is just not unlimited use.
 

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IStock artists are trying to make a living, just like you and me. I find the art is relatively inexpensive and good quality in many cases.

You can get various licences with credits you buy depending on how many times you intend to use said art. It's not hard to figure out. I think a run of 2000 on any substrate for a few dollars is an amazing buy.
If nobody bought anything from IStock, there would be no IStock. It's not there just for our (free) amusement.
 

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susie, I'm not trying to be rude or anything, so please don't take what I'm saying the wrong way...I don't (really) have that much of an issue..my only point is that you're paying for the right to use it, but then for the purposes you really need it, you have to pay even more! I agree, their price appear to be reasonable..for 2K shirt runs, etc. Bottom line, we'll probably just design our own "free" artwork, LOL.
 

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in the graphic design world, even comping is considered usage that the artist should be compensated for.

the advent of online stock photos/art has really blurred that distinction to the point where no one but us old heads even think about it anymore! used to be if you wanted to use it for any reason, you had to pay.
 

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Hi,

Has anyone here downloaded files form istockphotos with intentions of using/modifying images to t-shirt sales. If so, did you purchase an extened license policy? It is very confusing with the legal BS that they post.

Please Advise,

thanks!
CG
My first response to this thread was a couple of years ago, so I thought I should update my response :)

I have purchased from istockphoto several times since this thread was posted. They have some great t-shirt templates and I like the style of the vector artwork posted there. It seems more "current" than clipart.com

When I use the images for "regular" stuff (like webpages), I purchase the regular license.

When I've used the images and edited them for t-shirt designs, I purchased the extended license. For what you're getting, I think it's a great deal. Especially if you can find the exact image you want and you have zero design skills like me :)
 

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The 2000 limit seems reasonable for the money. Wouldn't most of the designs run out of popularity by then anyway? There's decent profit to be made if you're fortunate enough to sell 2000 shirts regularly huh?
 

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Hey everyone, I'm new to this too so if someone is forced to repeat themselves, my apologies. Are there copyright or trademark infringments for using movie quotes?
 

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IStock is a great way to go if you have no artist handy. Some of the art is downright exceptional.

I wanted an Elvgren licence for one image:
$1500 for one year for one image on one type of substrate :eek: (and that was several years ago!).

I know that's a well-known artist and all but, IStock sure looks cheap in comparison!
 

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Maybe I can help on this subject. I bought an istock image to use on a CD layout I was doing for a client. I was very unsure on what the limited license agreement actually covered, so I gave them a call. The lady I spoke to told me that because I was actually selling the CD and not the image that I would not need to purchase the extended license.

The best thing to do if you ever have any questions is to give them a call. The staff at istock is very friendly. I hope this helps.
 
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