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I never have trouble with 1 or 2 color shirts but these 3 color shirts have proven to be problematic for me. I did the same ones using different inks a year earlier and they held up just fine. After a few washes though, both the gray and navy, crack and seem to wash out revealing the white under base. From your experience, does this picture look like I over cured or under cured? I'm worried my heat gun may be going out.
 

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hard to tell from the photo, but I'm wondering if you didn't over flash and actually cure the ink, making the top print not bond properly.
If you think your temp gun is failing, replace as soon as possible.
Did you/have you done a stretch test ?
 

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You want to flash the underbase just enough so that it gels (feels dry to the touch) At this point your laser thermometer should get a reading of around 230°F. To get a feel for it, try poking the print with your fingernail. If it leaves a mark it's gelled properly. If it doesn't leave a mark it is overflashed.

For the final cure, I like to get a hot reading. Most inks cure at around 320°F but if you barely get there with a surface reading there is a chance that the bottom of the ink layer did not reach cure temp. Also, if you have a smaller dryer, you will notice different readings on different areas of the print, and the readings will become cooler as you send many shirts through one after another. For 100% cotton shirts, a reading of 340°F or so will not harm anything and will insure that the whole layer is cured. Be sure that your belt speed is slow enough so that the print remains at the temperature for awhile.

To "overcure" the ink would take a way higher temperature. I've hit exit temperatures of 400° before (by accident...) and it didn't harm the prints or the shirts.
 

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i'll toss my two cents worth in there. the base is overcured. proper bases should be tacky to the touch without having any ink on your finger after you touch it. overcured and the top prints have nothing to bond to. for bases i flash for max of 3secs. from a 230 mesh 5secs if using 160s that and also keep in mind pallets and prints flash quicker as the pallets heat up i also use quartz.
 
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