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I had 36 rib tanks tops screen printed, and the first day they cracked. The company told me that this is normal, and thats why they hate to screen print on rib tanks. If they told me this before, i would have done it. Is this normal?
 

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It's a shame, if they would have told me that, then I would have had them do the flat printing. They tried to go back and put them under the heat press to heat the ink up so it wont crack as bad. But how can I feel comfortable with selling them to my customers.
 

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It's a shame, if they would have told me that, then I would have had them do the flat printing. They tried to go back and put them under the heat press to heat the ink up so it wont crack as bad. But how can I feel comfortable with selling them to my customers.
To put it bluntly, get over it. People seem to have this magically theory that shirts from department stores are perfect. As a matter of fact, the shirts bought for $30 at department stores are worst than prints from local printers!

Have you never bought a ribbed tank top from a store and after washing and drying several times, it starts to crack and fade? It's normal wear and tear.

Although the printer could have told you that the ink may crack, you should also be 50% to blame for not asking! Printers can't tell or warn customers about every single thing that may or may not happen.

That's my thought, take it or leave it. Don't care.
 

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It's all good, I was told it will be better and that it will last much longer that doing heat transfers. Thats the only reason why i went with the screen print. And no, I have never bought a tank top with screen print on it, i thought only girls wear stuff like that. Thats my thought, take it or leave it.
But thanks, now i know.
 

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Hi all....

Here are some specialized tools to consider for your printing kit:
UniStretchAdditive
[media]http://www.rutlandinc.com/assets/printtds/321.pdf[/media]

Note that Wilflex, et.al. also have specialty modifiers to help bridge surface texture and permit print elongation.

I'll admit that the performance limit exists for those who should be wearing an XL and insist on squeezing into M and L's.

Our customers use a considerable amount of this stuff.
The other option if you're on white material is a high-saturation base or reducer added to the ink,
which then solves the problem by making the ink perform more like a dye, and less like an ink layer.

Happy trails to all!
 

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We use stretch additive all the time and it helps out a lot. We've printed on womens shirts and spandex which I assume are just as stretchy as those rib tanks and they didn't crack. I'm sure they are still prone to cracking compared to other garments over time, but the printer should've known to add something to the ink to help out the elasticity of it.
 
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