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Is This Legal? I have been to many forums asking this question "if you were to buy wholesale t-shirts from hanes,gildan,american apparel,alternate apparel, etc." would it be legal to take there neck line tags and puuting your own making seem as if your brand made them?
 

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...but there are legal requirements as to what goes on the tag you put in (search the forums for relabelling and you'll find a post or two about it). Most of the time if you just leave the original care/size tag and replace only the brand tag you should meet the requirements (they're designed that way for a reason).
 

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I know this is probably covered by the above but...I just wanted to double check with everyone here (especially you Solmu, as you seem to be "in the know" and "in the country"!).

I have FINALLY found a supplier for long sleeve infant bodysuits that, I think, I'm happy with their products, pricing, etc. They also have the advantage of being a little bit unique - their bodysuits are called "Add-A-Size" bodysuits, with two rows of snaps at the bottom to allow it to grow a little with the baby (the brand is "Halo Baby" in case anyone knows them).

So, my question is...is it still OK to relabel these as this is a unique feature of this brand's item? If they had a patent, for example (I don't know if they actually do), on using two rows of snaps like that, could I get in trouble for relabelling the garment?
 

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I think it would still be okay, but I definitely don't know for sure.

The thing is you're basically taking something you own, modifying it, and selling it. That's all things you have the right to do. If you were manufacturing them (or claiming to have manufactured them) that would certainly be different, but you're not.

As I said, I can't guarantee it's legal, but I don't think it would be different.

I haven't done any reading on this for a while, never got around to finishing the Australian laws (they're generally a lot more lenient), and don't recall anything specifically on this sort of thing. Sorry I can't give you a confident answer.
 

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Thanks so much for the reply!

Solmu said:
If you were manufacturing them (or claiming to have manufactured them) that would certainly be different, but you're not.
I guess what I'm worried about it - couldn't relabelling them be seen as claiming to have manufactured them? If I buy a "Hanes" t-shirt I assume that it was manufactured by - or under the directions of - Hanes. Since Halo Baby is Australian, there's no "RN" number that I'm placing on the new labels - it would be entirely MY logo, etc. with no mention of Halo Baby. If I bought such a shirt, I'd probably assume it was "made" by Fun Times X, not a blank that they bought, iykwim?
 

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Yeah, I know what you're getting at and I do think it's a legitimate concern.

I definitely can't tell you it's safe to do. You could try reading the Australian relabelleing standards, but 1) They cost money (despite being legally enforced they're not free to read... personally I find this insane), 2) I'm not sure if they say anything about it.

Might be worth seeing if you can get some free legal advice from a small business tribunal or similar?
 

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Solmu said:
Might be worth seeing if you can get some free legal advice from a small business tribunal or similar?
Good plan! Would it be insane to ring the company themselves and ask - or are they likely to say "no" even if it is OK because they don't want you removing their branding?
 

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funtimesx said:
Good plan! Would it be insane to ring the company themselves and ask - or are they likely to say "no" even if it is OK because they don't want you removing their branding?
To be honest I don't think there's much point ringing.

If they say "no" because they think it's a threat to their business, it may or may not be a reflection on the law.

If they say yes, that verbal permission won't mean much if they decide to change their mind, or the person you called didn't have the authority to answer the question, or etc.

There's an even greater chance that whoever you rang simply wouldn't be able to answer the question.

You could try putting it to them in writing if you were so inclined (not an expensive thing to try), but I don't know that it would get a response - plus you'd have to use your real name/address, in which case they may refuse to supply to you in future... so I guess that just isn't worth the risk after the effort you've gone to to find a supplier.

Phone calls are cheap if you think it might give you some leads. I think the best bet would be reliable external advice and not discussing it with the supplier themself though.
 
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