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I think that's the point :) You know that as an experienced machine owner, but when you are new and thinking about starting, all you see at a trade show is shirts being printed. The pretreat process is not usually shown because the shirts have been pretreated before the show.

I agree with the idea of showing more of the overall process at the time of purchase. Even pretreating (especially when the sales staff is saying "just use a Wagner sprayer")

Having a training class to show maintenance afterwards is a great idea, I just wonder if there are people who get to the training class and feel overwhelmed because the maintenance they were shown is beyond what they were expecting.
I have a lot of people come to my shop for a quick overview of the machine and maintenance procedures before going to training at AA. It is a LOT to grasp in 2 short days (especially when distracted by the smell of yummy cheese steaks - mmmm WizWit). Coming to my shop or anyone's for that matter outside of the sales office or manufacturers building is hugely beneficial as you get a real sense of the workflow and can have a good base to start with prior to jumping head first into the training.
 

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I think that's the point :) You know that as an experienced machine owner, but when you are new and thinking about starting, all you see at a trade show is shirts being printed. The pretreat process is not usually shown because the shirts have been pretreated before the show.

I agree with the idea of showing more of the overall process at the time of purchase. Even pretreating (especially when the sales staff is saying "just use a Wagner sprayer")

Having a training class to show maintenance afterwards is a great idea, I just wonder if there are people who get to the training class and feel overwhelmed because the maintenance they were shown is beyond what they were expecting.


At every trade show we do I am always struck by how many people come to our booth, after getting demonstrations at some other sellers, and are surprised to hear that they need to pretreat garments in order to print white ink. The comment often made is - they were shown how the other printers worked, had dark shirts printed on them, and at no time during the entire presentation did the salesman ever bring up pretreatment.

So I absolutely agree with you that it is important to go over the "entire" production process with any potential buyer.
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Another thing is experience, I am sure that I can replace parts much faster due to my experience. If you have someone experienced doing maintenance its going to look easy until you have to do it yourself, which can be deceiving.

This same theory goes for pretreat, using a spray gun you have so many variables with consistency. I guarantee, every distributor has come to a show with a "bad batch" of pretreated shirts. It doesn't mean that the person doesn't know how to pretreat but you don't know until you print and press. Its a gamble, pretreat goes bad, parts go bad and its just a part of DTG as with any print method.

As mentioned before, technology is evolving and these processes and procedures are improving. So as time goes on, we may be seeing more of what the printer can do instead of what it can't.
 

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I think that's the point :) You know that as an experienced machine owner, but when you are new and thinking about starting, all you see at a trade show is shirts being printed. The pretreat process is not usually shown because the shirts have been pretreated before the show.
Having pretreated shirts ahead of time is not only easier but it's less messy especially when demonstrating with a Wagner sprayer. Pretreat is sticky and goes everywhere especially with fans or air conditioning running. During a show, it wouldn't be wise and don't think allowed on the sales floor. I don't know for sure, but having pretreat in a contained area I wouldn't ever expect it on a sales floor except for in a pretreat machine.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Having pretreated shirts ahead of time is not only easier but it's less messy especially when demonstrating with a Wagner sprayer.
I'm sure it's easier for the exhibitor (that's why they do it :)).

I'm just trying to think of ways of better educating buyers before the sale on some of the "non glamorous" parts of the DTG printing process to maybe avoid some of those disgruntled forum posts later down the line.

During a show, it wouldn't be wise and don't think allowed on the sales floor.
There should be some way to contain that environment. I've seen some pretty creative things on trade show floors :)
 

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I'm sure it's easier for the exhibitor (that's why they do it :)).

I'm just trying to think of ways of better educating buyers before the sale on some of the "non glamorous" parts of the DTG printing process to maybe avoid some of those disgruntled forum posts later down the line.

There should be some way to contain that environment. I've seen some pretty creative things on trade show floors :)


The problem is the floor space required. All exhibitors pay a large amount of money for every square foot of their booth. So devoting a corner of a booth just for that can be very expensive. I agree with you that it would be nice to demonstrate spraying the pretreat by hand. Perhaps the easiest way at a show is to have a video of the process playing on a monitor.
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My chosen method of becoming educated on the "how to" of DTG maintenance is to dig through the large number of videos that are posted on the topic. Bellquette has a pretty extensive selection covering basic daily maintenance to complete ink flushing. They also have pdfs on their user forum covering damper replacement and head recovery (I think you have to be an owner to participate there though.)
 

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I would think you could just loop a YouTube channel on DTG maintenance on a big screen and draw a large crowd at a show. That would keep the Sales guys free to talk while people learn. There's my $1 Million idea for the day... ;-)

This is kind of like an in person version of online content marketing. Provide valuable information to customers and they will come to you and likely ask more questions...
 
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