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like TABOB said get adequate ventilation
whoever your supplier is, ask them for the msds (material safety data sheet) which they have to supply to you

here is something from omniprint (their adhesive is supposedly cpsia comliant, probably after proper application, not before):
WARNING: May cause damage to organs through prolonged or repeated exposure. Do not breath dust/fume/gas/mist/vapors/spray.
even the adding/sifting/re-bottling of the adhesive should have an exhaust fan over it, and keep your face from being directly over it and hindering the uptake of the fumes
for something like this you could use a positional-type fan like below, then it can be adjusted to where you want it
if you look at the arm it looks very similar to those cheap desk lamps (hint, you could make a whole unit for under $50)

 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The fumes from a fireplace are toxic too, but people have fireplaces in their houses.
Ventilation is what you need.
Sadly a proper ventilation wouldn't be very possible in my case . May i ask which part of the whole process exerts the "toxic" fumes? Say I manage to get ready to press dtf prints , Would solely the heat press process be risky without ventilation aswell?
 

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Sadly a proper ventilation wouldn't be very possible in my case . May i ask which part of the whole process exerts the "toxic" fumes? Say I manage to get ready to press dtf prints , Would solely the heat press process be risky without ventilation aswell?
Alternatives to good ventilation (or supplemental to) are respirator mask, or fume extractor, but really neither is desirable for various reasons.

The curing is the most hazardous part of the process. After that, it's the dust while powdering that gets airborne, left on surfaces, or inadvertently wiped on your face. I cringe when I watch most amateur youtubes about the process with great disregard for the hazard, and lack of simple cautions.

Pressing pre-made prints is not a hazard, at least not of any notable significance.
 

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While there are no harmful emissions, the powder adhesive is exceptionally fine and can generate dust, so it's best to wear respiratory protection when working with the powder.
You've got this backwards.

The safety sheet states that the powder is "virtually nontoxic by inhalation".
Still, I wouldn't recommend breathing it...
Decomposition in the body will most likely release toxins, but it's a very slow process.

Pressing the transfers is supposed to be safe as well, but I don't trust it either.

If you are baking transfers, you absolutely need good ventilation.
The fumes released contain isocyanate compounds.
 

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Okay, so this video just came across my feed a couple of days ago. Looks like he somehow forgot to order or the seller forgot to ship the powder shaker. But otherwise, it shows him hooking up an air filter to be used during curing.

 

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We made an opinion poll within our closed groups, and many favored non-toxic.
Nothing is toxic and everything is toxic at the same time.
The amount of exposure/intake is what makes the difference.

A very good example is the often lethal water intoxication.
Water, just like any other substance, can be considered a poison when over-consumed in a brief period of time.
If you are pressing a couple of transfers per week, there is nothing to worry about.
Inhaling polyurethane fumes for hours every day, is very a different story.
 
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