T-Shirt Forums banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need some advice, I had a customer call me today to let me know that the shirts we screen printed for them were cracking after the first wash and dry. The shirts were supplied by them, they were fruit of the loom 100% cotton and we used Ryonet opaque white 301 RC Enviro. Am I doing something wrong or is this the wrong ink?

We are a water-based shop.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,920 Posts
I need some advice, I had a customer call me today to let me know that the shirts we screen printed for them were cracking after the first wash and dry. The shirts were supplied by them, they were fruit of the loom 100% cotton and we used Ryonet opaque white 301 RC Enviro. Am I doing something wrong or is this the wrong ink?

We are a water-based shop.

Better ask Ryonet. Have the same problem before and it was the ink (not ryonets), never used it again after.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
I have a shirt printed with that ink that I did at one of their seminars almost 2 years ago and it has never cracked after many washings. White water based inks in general are more prone to cracking, but they shouldn't crack after the first washing.

I suspect that you may have over cured. Did you do a test wash? Maybe you could do some testing to find the right settings for this ink with your dryer.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
We primarily use the Enviro-Line Matsui paints from Ryonet. I have yet to see a problem such as yours. Were they cured to 320-330? It could be there was an accidental folding of a small sliver of shirt causing the problem. Maybe the ink is just expired or defective or the customer has a crazy drier and didn't follow washing instructions properly.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
I have a shirt printed with that ink that I did at one of their seminars almost 2 years ago and it has never cracked after many washings. White water based inks in general are more prone to cracking, but they shouldn't crack after the first washing.

I suspect that you may have over cured. Did you do a test wash? Maybe you could do some testing to find the right settings for this ink with your dryer.
A newbie here too, I use Jacquared Professional Screen Printing inks. I have been using them for months with no problems but lately have been getting lots of cracking. What does over curing mean?

thanks!

Sorry to hijack the thread.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,920 Posts
A newbie here too, I use Jacquared Professional Screen Printing inks. I have been using them for months with no problems but lately have been getting lots of cracking. What does over curing mean?

thanks!

Sorry to hijack the thread.
Here's an article I read...

Can overcuring and overflashing become a problem when printing plastisol inks?

Yes, if you are printing on polyester/cotton blended or 100% polyester garments too much heat can cause the dyes in the garment to migrate through the ink film. Just as undercuring the ink film can cause the dyes to sublimate and migrate through the ink film turning the white ink printed on the red garment pink, too much heat can produce the same result. One major uniform manufacturer in the Southeast recommends that the temperature of their 100% polyester uniforms not exceed 330° F. Even though the ink film is fully cured the components used to give the inks their low-bleed characteristics do not stand a chance if too much heat is applied to the garment. As one of our technical representatives says "Remember these inks are low-bleed, not no bleed". When printing any polyester blended garment you will not only have to ensure a full cure but also ensure that you do not overcure.

Overflashing can cause a problem with the adhesion of the top colors adhering to the underbase color. If for some reason a printer would actually cure the underbase print he would get what is called poor "intercoat adhesion" of the top colors to the underbase colors. Recommended gel or flash cure temperatures of inks commonly used to underbase are approximately 240—250°
 

· Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
hmmm, so since I'm using water-based I wonder what is causing it.

I did think that maybe it was the fabric. It has happened 3 times. Twice on Alternative Apparel Pima Cotton infant bodysuits... luckily there were both my daughters size so now she has them, and the other was some 100% cotton brand I got from Trendy Blanks... I thought maybe there was a film or coating on the fabric so I washed.

It worries me a bit because I have small business and really don't want a bad reputation.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,920 Posts
hmmm, so since I'm using water-based I wonder what is causing it.

I did think that maybe it was the fabric. It has happened 3 times. Twice on Alternative Apparel Pima Cotton infant bodysuits... luckily there were both my daughters size so now she has them, and the other was some 100% cotton brand I got from Trendy Blanks... I thought maybe there was a film or coating on the fabric so I washed.

It worries me a bit because I have small business and really don't want a bad reputation.
Better try other brands of waterbase ink, I had the same problem before with one of my new waterbase ink too and never ever used it again.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
445 Posts
Only one reason for cracking after the first washing. It has not been cured long enough or at the proper temperature. When switching ink brands read the tech sheet from the manufacturer carefully and then print samples and wash them yourself first several times to determine the right heat and conveyor speed settings for that ink. Keep in mind....the thicker the ink deposit ...the longer it will take to cure all the way through. Dry to the touch is not the same as dry all the way through the ink film. Test, test , test...save yourself money in the long run
 

· Registered
Joined
·
9,603 Posts
Only one reason for cracking after the first washing. It has not been cured long enough or at the proper temperature. When switching ink brands read the tech sheet from the manufacturer carefully and then print samples and wash them yourself first several times to determine the right heat and conveyor speed settings for that ink. Keep in mind....the thicker the ink deposit ...the longer it will take to cure all the way through. Dry to the touch is not the same as dry all the way through the ink film. Test, test , test...save yourself money in the long run
That is what I am thinking too. I saw those IR dryers and how quick they cure inks and tried it with a 1500w halogen. Of course IR heats differently from most other heat source.

The 1500w halogen "cures" in 4-5 seconds and scorches in 8 seconds or so but gave me all sorts of problems. Switched back to my 500w halogen and the problem went away. The 1500w may still work but have to raise it higher for a slower cure.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top