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When screen pritning... how do I match a color to an ink.
I mean let's say I wanted a certain type of orange , would I take the yellow ink that I have and the red that I have and mix them according to some chart or reference sheet?
Or do I have to get the ink suppliers to pre mix a whole tub of ink for me in that shade of orange ?

Thanks

:rolleyes:
 

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If you don't have a mixing system, you can get suppliers to mix a pantone color for you.

If it isn't that crucial, try mixing it yourself. But without a mixing system, I don't think there are any charts to go by.
 

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No charts without a true PMS mixing system. Essentially you have to go the old skool route and use the normal color wheel. You will be close but not exact and it will be hard to get the same color down the road when you need to mix more.
Most plasticols are not true to color. If you use a stock red, yellow & blue you can bet there are other colors used to get that red, yellow and blue thus mixing red and yellow will get you an orange but not a true orange.

Getting set up with a mixing system will cost a lil but ultimately is the best way to go if your having to do a lot of mixing.
We use the Rutland M2 series and the Wilflex Pigment mixing systems.
 

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i agree in investing in a pantone color chart. there's no guess work. i don't know about the inks that you have, but mine don't have a color breakdown. trying to mix colors without having a true red (a red that doesn't lean towards blue or yellow) is frustrating.

i think we get our ink mixed from ryanscreensupply.com. it's $20 per quart, which is a good deal for a custom color you can't find in a regular ink line. and of course, it's fun!!! let's not forget about our good friend, fun.
 

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Fluid said:
If you use a stock red, yellow & blue you can bet there are other colors used to get that red, yellow and blue thus mixing red and yellow will get you an orange but not a true orange.
Particularly fun when you mix some black into your yellow and end up with green, or some black into your red and end up with purple (both of which have happened to me).
 

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No charts without a true PMS mixing system. Essentially you have to go the old skool route and use the normal color wheel. You will be close but not exact and it will be hard to get the same color down the road when you need to mix more.
Most plasticols are not true to color. If you use a stock red, yellow & blue you can bet there are other colors used to get that red, yellow and blue thus mixing red and yellow will get you an orange but not a true orange.

Getting set up with a mixing system will cost a lil but ultimately is the best way to go if your having to do a lot of mixing.
We use the Rutland M2 series and the Wilflex Pigment mixing systems.
Where did you bought this systems, I'm looking but I don't find it.
 

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What brand of Ink is on your shelf now and what type of orange are you going for. what color shirts is this going on. More often then not, by the time my ink is a perfect pantone match printed on a colored shirt. the ink in the bucket isn't like the chart. orange is one of those colors that looks different on every background color.
 

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With a little practice PMS matching from a dozen gallons of standard colors is not to big a deal. I've found mixing that way usually produces purer colors than a mixing system. It's been a while since I've used one so I'm sure they've improved, but the colors always seemed a bit grey with the mixing system, especially browns and purples. :)
 
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