T-Shirt Forums banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This might not be the exact place to put this so correct me if im wrong. Some designs my freind and I have come up with are going to have to be done with all over printing. I looked at some of the companies listed on here and most of them you can submit a design from what I saw. I guess im just concerned about legalities. For those of you doing all over printing, can you just submit a design you created and they print them on shirts for you and you just sell them to the customer? Even with our heat transfer images we've created, just have our images printed out, transfer them to the shirt and sell it? My friend and I are in the process of getting all the info we'll need together and were just trying to figure out how to get all the printing done without running into legal trouble. All of our designs are custom made by us. I just want to make sure to follow the right procedure.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
27,691 Posts
Re: Heat transfer and all over printing

Can you explain what specifically you think would cause a legal issue with sending a design to a printer to get printed up?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Re: Heat transfer and all over printing

well if i send my design to the printer and then sold the shirts for my profit, would the printer have to put their company name because they printed it? I saw some results from heat transfer shirts and the company that printed the transfer paper put their name on it. It may have been their design though, im not sure.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
14,176 Posts
Re: Heat transfer and all over printing

well if i send my design to the printer and then sold the shirts for my profit, would the printer have to put their company name because they printed it? I saw some results from heat transfer shirts and the company that printed the transfer paper put their name on it. It may have been their design though, im not sure.
Yeah, anytime you see the heat transfer companies name on it, it is one of their designs.

If they print your design for you, their name will not be printed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Re: Heat transfer and all over printing

Yeah, anytime you see the heat transfer companies name on it, it is one of their designs.

If they print your design for you, their name will not be printed.
Thats what I thought but I wanted to be sure. I emailed a company to get all over printing pricing and more information about it. Does anyone have any ballpark ideas on what that costs? I thought I read most places require at least a 144 piece minimum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,766 Posts
Re: Heat transfer and all over printing

well if i send my design to the printer and then sold the shirts for my profit, would the printer have to put their company name because they printed it? I saw some results from heat transfer shirts and the company that printed the transfer paper put their name on it. It may have been their design though, I'm not sure.
That would be what we call a stock design. They own the rights. If you have a design then you simply send it to one of the printers that most of us use and have the design printed for you. It is yours. period. You press on shirts and sell. Bingo.. it is that easy. No legal issues unless the design is taken from another source and you were not the originator of it. Lou
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
27,691 Posts
Re: Heat transfer and all over printing

I emailed a company to get all over printing pricing and more information about it. Does anyone have any ballpark ideas on what that costs? I thought I read most places require at least a 144 piece minimum.
Ballpark is "pretty expensive" (since it's a complicated process). Like around $12+ per shirt.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
14,176 Posts
Re: Heat transfer and all over printing

Is your post two separate questions; one about transfers and one about all over printing? Or are you asking if transfers can be used for all over printing?

One method to doing all over printing is to use transfers. It helps if your design is such that two (or more) transfers could be pieced together.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Re: Heat transfer and all over printing

Is your post two separate questions; one about transfers and one about all over printing? Or are you asking if transfers can be used for all over printing?

One method to doing all over printing is to use transfers. It helps if your design is such that two (or more) transfers could be pieced together.
Well since i originally posted I understand a little better on how both methods work. I didnt know that you could piece together transfers to create that all over printing look, thanks for that info.
Im clear about the legality issue, thanks everyone for that info also!
Im still waiting for a response to my email i sent to the company about all over printing. When they say 144 piece minimum, is that per design or total sale? Like could I have 12 different designs sent to them and have 12 shirts printed for each? Or is it 1 design, 144 piece minimum bottom line?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
27,691 Posts
Re: Heat transfer and all over printing

Well since i originally posted I understand a little better on how both methods work. I didnt know that you could piece together transfers to create that all over printing look, thanks for that info.
Im clear about the legality issue, thanks everyone for that info also!
Im still waiting for a response to my email i sent to the company about all over printing. When they say 144 piece minimum, is that per design or total sale? Like could I have 12 different designs sent to them and have 12 shirts printed for each? Or is it 1 design, 144 piece minimum bottom line?
The minimums are per DESIGN, not per order.

There's no way to get an all over print screenprinted design done for only 12 pieces. The setup process is much to expensive and time consuming for printer to just run 12 pieces. It wouldn't make business sense for them and you.

Because of the way screen printing works, the more t-shirts you print PER DESIGN, the better the screen printer can recoup the costs of burning films, setting up screens, setting up the presses for your t-shirt design. So the more you run PER DESIGN, the better discounts they can extend to you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Re: Heat transfer and all over printing

The minimums are per DESIGN, not per order.

There's no way to get an all over print screenprinted design done for only 12 pieces. The setup process is much to expensive and time consuming for printer to just run 12 pieces. It wouldn't make business sense for them and you.

Because of the way screen printing works, the more t-shirts you print PER DESIGN, the better the screen printer can recoup the costs of burning films, setting up screens, setting up the presses for your t-shirt design. So the more you run PER DESIGN, the better discounts they can extend to you.
Cool, got it thanks! And thank you everyone for your input.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,512 Posts
Re: Heat transfer and all over printing

While it's possible to make an all-over print using heat transfers, that means you're stuck using either digital transfers, or plastisol - neither of which is usually used in a professional all-over print, as they're too stiff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
268 Posts
Re: Heat transfer and all over printing

If you like that discharged/waterbase look you could achieve that with dye sublimation and do an allover look in the process. It would also be much cheaper if you are doing small runs but you will have to print them on t-shirts with at least 30% polyester content.

John
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
27,691 Posts
Re: Heat transfer and all over printing

If you like that discharged/waterbase look you could achieve that with dye sublimation and do an allover look in the process. It would also be much cheaper if you are doing small runs but you will have to print them on t-shirts with at least 30% polyester content.

John
Really, it only needs 30% poly content? I thought it needed much more to hold the colors?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
268 Posts
Re: Heat transfer and all over printing

Really, it only needs 30% poly content? I thought it needed much more to hold the colors?
Color saturation has to do more with the quality of the polyester that was used when the fabric was knitted. Dye sublimation works by heating the polyester fibers so that they swell which leaves openings in the yarn that is woven in to the fabric. When it cools the ink, which turns to a heavy gas when it is going through the same heat process, bonds with the polyesters and gets wedged into the fiber as the yarn goes back to it's original state. Most people like to err on the side of safety thus most will say 50%/50% but it can be done on 30%/70%. Dye sublimation can be done on any synthetic yarn such as rayon, acetate, etc.

John
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
27,691 Posts
Re: Heat transfer and all over printing

Color saturation has to do more with the quality of the polyester that was used when the fabric was knitted. Dye sublimation works by heating the polyester fibers so that they swell which leaves openings in the yarn that is woven in to the fabric. When it cools the ink, which turns to a heavy gas when it is going through the same heat process, bonds with the polyesters and gets wedged into the fiber as the yarn goes back to it's original state. Most people like to err on the side of safety thus most will say 50%/50% but it can be done on 30%/70%. Dye sublimation can be done on any synthetic yarn such as rayon, acetate, etc.

John
I was wondering about that (dye sub on rayon). Does that mean that dye sub could be done on bamboo (which is processed sort of like rayon from what I read)?

I bought my first affliction t-shirt a couple of weeks ago to see what all the hype was about and I picked up one from their bamboo line. Since I'm "in the biz" I was set to be skeptical, but when I got the t-shirt in person, I was freakin' amazed. I think it was a 70/30 bamboo/cotton blend. I could see what the hype was about as far as the no feel on the garment. There were some foil/shiny silver areas in the print that felt the same as the rest of the garment. When I held the t-shirt up, I couldn't see any real "ink" anywhere that would suggest discharge or waterbased. I'll have to get some good pictures of it.

This is the one I bought: Affliction Bamboo Collection - Geisha Stare Short Sleeve Tee in Blue A725
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
268 Posts
Re: Heat transfer and all over printing

I was wondering about that (dye sub on rayon). Does that mean that dye sub could be done on bamboo (which is processed sort of like rayon from what I read)?

I bought my first affliction t-shirt a couple of weeks ago to see what all the hype was about and I picked up one from their bamboo line. Since I'm "in the biz" I was set to be skeptical, but when I got the t-shirt in person, I was freakin' amazed. I think it was a 70/30 bamboo/cotton blend. I could see what the hype was about as far as the no feel on the garment. There were some foil/shiny silver areas in the print that felt the same as the rest of the garment. When I held the t-shirt up, I couldn't see any real "ink" anywhere that would suggest discharge or waterbased. I'll have to get some good pictures of it.

This is the one I bought: Affliction Bamboo Collection - Geisha Stare Short Sleeve Tee in Blue A725
No, bamboo is a naturally occuring fiber so you can't do it on bamboo unless they knit in a synthetic fiber.

Most of Afflictions shirts are done in waterbase discharge but they run them through an enzyme/silicone wash afterwards. The enzyme wash exhausts any of the WB/DC ink left on the garment so that you don't feel any of the process and the silicone softeners lay a sort of cap over it all to give it a very "buttery" handfeel.
The weight of the fabric also dictates the handfeel. I like to use a 40 single jersey in my T-shirts. That's why Afflictions t-shirts feel so nice. They like to use 30 and 40 single fabric that drapes really nice and washes up really soft.

I've done hundreds of thousands of garments like this when I owned a dyehouse/washhouse here in L.A. so really nothing new. If you ever decide to do this process make sure you tell your washhouse that you want them to add a little caustic soda into the bath to lower the PH in the water in the softener cycle. The silicone softeners penetrate better at lower PH's. Also, tell them not to use pure silicone but to do a 50% regular softener and 50% silicone mixture. 100% silicone softener tends to get gummy if you leave it too long in the dryer. I used to do this exact process for American Apparel since the manager of their custom/private label department was a good friend of mine and used to send me a lot of their customers for wash/dye processing.

John
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
27,691 Posts
Re: Heat transfer and all over printing

The enzyme wash exhausts any of the WB/DC ink left on the garment so that you don't feel any of the process and the silicone softeners lay a sort of cap over it all to give it a very "buttery" handfeel
Ahhh, sneaky :) The wash *after* the print to get rid of the process feel. Very slick.

If you ever decide to do this process make sure you tell your washhouse that you want them to add a little caustic soda into the bath to lower the PH in the water in the softener cycle. The silicone softeners penetrate better at lower PH's. Also, tell them not to use pure silicone but to do a 50% regular softener and 50% silicone mixture. 100% silicone softener tends to get gummy if you leave it too long in the dryer. I used to do this exact process for American Apparel since the manager of their custom/private label department was a good friend of mine and used to send me a lot of their customers for wash/dye processing.
Man, we need to get you your own topic in the finishing section of the forum where you can drop some knowledge about how to find a dye house and what to ask for for which types of feel. That's good stuff!

:tipthank:

I've done hundreds of thousands of garments like this when I owned a dyehouse/washhouse here in L.A. so really nothing new
What's old hat to you is great information for the folks here who are just learning about how all this "speciality" stuff is done :)
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top