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Discussion Starter #1
I have to vent on this one. Im sooo tired of cheap customers. I offer my services to everyone for 1 shirt to 1000 shirts. I charge by the quantity of shirts ordered. We have a brochure with prices and there are no gimmicks played.
So, why do we still get the games.
When a prospect comes in the first thing I do is give them a brochure of our services and piont them to the sample rack that has all brands and types of printing.
Why do customers ask for the price of 100 shirts
Lets say the price is $4.76 a shirt or $476.00.
there are no other charges.
that same customer turns around and ask to have
12 shirts printed and then they want to pay $4.76 a shirt. NO! our borchure clearly states the price for 12 shirts.
Then we have people that want to bring their own shirts. Fine but the price doesnt change!
We do exceptional work and we use good quality shirts. We are very competitive in our area.
Do people not understand the art of the trade and the work that goes in to producing a great t-shirt. I do this because I love what I do, but I still need to make a profit. In the end, what one doesnt want the next one will and business is still good. I love creating shirts
 

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I was doing a show once selling Jerzee t's with very nice prints for only $6.00 each which I
think is a great price & a couple of people aske me if I could knock off a couple of bucks.
They must think we pull them out of the air for free.
 

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This is the case with any trade. The customers are going to you because they can't do it themselves. Some may have some knowledge of how it works, but most don't. Whether you are printing t-shirts, fixing cars or doing taxes, you are always going to have customers that just don't understand the process.

Maybe you can make a separate sheet that you keep handy when it comes up that itemizes the prices. So the customer can see that there are setup charges like films, screens, etc, regardless of the size of the order. Then they can see how the price of the shirt and the price of the printing is high for low volume, but gets lower for higher volume. It's not a difficult concept, but for someone not familiar with it, they just may need to see it written out in front of them. Most will get it once they see it. The ones that don't, you don't want them as customers anyway.

Why do customers ask for the price of 100 shirts
Lets say the price is $4.76 a shirt or $476.00.
there are no other charges.
that same customer turns around and ask to have
12 shirts printed and then they want to pay $4.76 a shirt. NO! our borchure clearly states the price for 12 shirts.
Well, I think there are two common reasons for this.

Anyone starting a clothing brand wants to sound legitimate. So they ask about higher volume just to get your attention. But the reality is, that volume probably doesn't fit their budget and they settle for lower volume.

Or sometimes people just need 12 shirts. But they think to themselves, "If I can get a great deal on 100, I'll get 100." But that's usually just a foolish thought, and they end up just getting the 12 shirts.

So in both cases, there is really no chance they will get the 100 shirts, but once they see the price, they assume it's the same even for small orders. So again, I think it will help for you to be able to show itemized pricing to help them understand.

Then we have people that want to bring their own shirts. Fine but the price doesnt change!
So when you quote 100 shirts, does that $4.76 price include the shirt?

If so, then you should definitely have different pricing for when customers bring their own shirts. Because in that case, you are only providing the print service.

But if your prices are just for printing, then I can understand that the prices would be the same whether you or the customer supply the shirts.
 

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Do people not understand the art of the trade and the work that goes in to producing a great t-shirt.
no they don't.
should they tho? i don't know anymore. i always liked to educate my customers if possible but even then sometimes they still wanted a deal. there's a difference between someone not knowing the cost and someone looking for a deal.
 

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Then we have people that want to bring their own shirts. Fine but the price doesnt change!
That sounds confusing even to me. The price should change if what you're providing is changing.

If you're providing the t-shirt and the printing, that should be one price.

If you're providing *just* the printing, that should be another price altogether

If your business model doesn't allow for customers to bring in your own shirt, then I would suggest saying you don't print on customer supplied garments. I think that might cause less confusion and frustration when they see the odd pricing.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
That sounds confusing even to me. The price should change if what you're providing is changing.

If you're providing the t-shirt and the printing, that should be one price.

If you're providing *just* the printing, that should be another price altogether

If your business model doesn't allow for customers to bring in your own shirt, then I would suggest saying you don't print on customer supplied garments. I think that might cause less confusion and frustration when they see the odd pricing.
Yes your right. I use to let customers bring their own shirts but when I did this they would always bring me the cheapest shirts and sometimes they would be used and even dirty. I dont want to print on just anything. I am one of the top rated stores in the area and we get alot of referral business.God forbide, someone sees my work on
a shirt thats falling apart.:)
So now I do tell them I only print on shirts that I provide and I tell them Why.
Actually I think some inks print better on some fabrics. Ex: When Im doing a heat transfer on a white t-shirt, I prefer to use a tight weave shirt because the photo tends to not crack from my experience.
Also, when a customer provides shirts for screen printing, lets say a 100 shirts, I always have a 3-5 shirts that are perfect and have to be replaced.
When I provide the shirts I eat the lost, but Im expecting it so I order 2 more shirts of each size.
If I dont use it fine I just add it to my stock.
When a customer provides shirts and a few get messed up I have to hunt for that brand and its a hassle to me because we specialize in next day printing so 90% of the jobs are rushed.
This leads me to wondering - One the average
how many bad prints should I have on 100 shirts?:confused:
 

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Discussion Starter #12
This is the case with any trade. The customers are going to you because they can't do it themselves. Some may have some knowledge of how it works, but most don't. Whether you are printing t-shirts, fixing cars or doing taxes, you are always going to have customers that just don't understand the process.

Maybe you can make a separate sheet that you keep handy when it comes up that itemizes the prices. So the customer can see that there are setup charges like films, screens, etc, regardless of the size of the order. Then they can see how the price of the shirt and the price of the printing is high for low volume, but gets lower for higher volume. It's not a difficult concept, but for someone not familiar with it, they just may need to see it written out in front of them. Most will get it once they see it. The ones that don't, you don't want them as customers anyway.


Well, I think there are two common reasons for this.

Anyone starting a clothing brand wants to sound legitimate. So they ask about higher volume just to get your attention. But the reality is, that volume probably doesn't fit their budget and they settle for lower volume.

Or sometimes people just need 12 shirts. But they think to themselves, "If I can get a great deal on 100, I'll get 100." But that's usually just a foolish thought, and they end up just getting the 12 shirts.

So in both cases, there is really no chance they will get the 100 shirts, but once they see the price, they assume it's the same even for small orders. So again, I think it will help for you to be able to show itemized pricing to help them understand.


So when you quote 100 shirts, does that $4.76 price include the shirt?

If so, then you should definitely have different pricing for when customers bring their own shirts. Because in that case, you are only providing the print service.

But if your prices are just for printing, then I can understand that the prices would be the same whether you or the customer supply the shirts.
Sounds like a winner. I will do that. Also the $4.76 incudes the shirt. That would be hanes Tagless.Set up fees and all included. We did that because customers had such a hard time calculating set-up fees and etc.
I do have a list with the screen fee & printing cost for customers wanting different brands of shirts and then we just add them together
 

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There are the customers who always try to get a better price, just because.

I have had it in my animal care service. Haggling is just what they do.

My response is usually "These are my set prices. You can see that I offer a discount when...(and them explain)." I don't get emotionally upset about it; just state it in a matter of fact tone. I have only very rarely had a client continue to badger me on pricing. Most accept the quote, and may even embarrassedly say something like "You can't blame me for trying" or something.
 

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I would like to add one more on this topic, because this kind of cheap tricks by some customers irritate me more than everything, the total respect on the work that we do are being stepped on and like what has been said, they will not come to us if this people know what we do. But what irritate me more when it comes to this subject are the printers that allow this cheap customers do this things to us. I know that everyone of us have our own pricing guide, but there are printers out there that actually allow this cheap things to happen just for whatever reason, I know some of us maybe on bad situation, but to be cheap just to get something going will not help you either. So until those fly by night printers continue to evolve and I know they will, this things will happen. So just keep your heads up, invest more in learning good stuff in our trade, be proud on what you do, don't settle for giving your customers a good work but make sure it's always better if not the best you can offer. For as long as you know your pricing is fair to what you can offer, I guarantee you, next time your customer comes, price will not even an issue. Don't be afraid to lose those cheap #%$$ customers.
 

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I think that your customers, even potential customers should be treated like customers. You should've already asked the customer if they needed help way before they got to the point of asking you any questions about anything.
Most customers are nervous and some may even think their questions are dumb.

I've been guilty of explaining the process so thoroughly that my customers could go home and do it themselves if they wanted to. I love interacting with my clients and it does put them at ease with the whole process.

Some customers, not all, do try to chisel on price. I try to have set pricing as a launching point, but I would never let a client go elsewhere due to pricing. I'll match any price within reason. That customer may or may not come back, but if they do, they can potentially send referrals your way as well. And trust me, there are printers out there that will print that same job for way less than $4.76 / 100.

I do have a suggestion for tshirtgirl214 : have someone edit the content on your website. there are some typos that should be corrected. and smile when the next customer rolls in. not saying you don't, but the first post in this thread sounded like you were annoyed.
 

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I’ve been in sales for over 30 years selling everything from ¼x20 nuts to million dollar machining centers. If you have ever gone to a sales seminar, the one thing they stress is “never sell on price”. If you know that your product is as good as or better than the next guy, then you sell on your “value added” services. These would include: customer service, shipping, quality of product and delivery time. If they b***h about your price, tell them to bring you a quote and you will “see what you can do”. Never commit yourself to matching the other guy’s price. I can’t tell you how many times I did that and they came to me to have the job done at my price. Just make sure that you follow through with your commitment with them.
 
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