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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, everyone. I'm new to this business and I read around the forum and have found that most people use IronAll or Transjet II for transfer paper. However, I do not have a heat press and will be using a home-iron. How will the quality be? I used some Office Depot transfer sheets on a white tshirt and there ended up being a slightly visible white outline of the paper on the shirt (even though the shirt is white...). Does this happen with the better quality transfer sheets too?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
so using a hand iron would result in a worse image? or just an image that doesn't last multiple washings? also, anyone using ironall dark transfer paper with an iron, is there still that slight outline of the sheet on the shirts? sorry i know i have alot of questions:)
 

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I doubt if anyone here uses an iron for applying heat transfers. Pro World has a 15x15 heat press for $299. That is very affordable and not hard to save up for.
 

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Not knocking you man, but I am 21. I started my shirt line last year just really got it running in January. I work 8-5 5 days a week some Saturdays to pay for everything. Including bills. My shirt biz barely pays for itself some months it doesn't. My point is If you feel it's worth it an will do good get a part time job and get what you need cuz take it from someone who tried to use homeade things it won't be worth it. Save up the money and until you get the hear press be doing marketing or research. If u think it is worth going after Go get it. But that's my 2 cents
 

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I have 3-4 packages of the ones from the office supply stores, and they do leave that ring and aren't very good. It really turned me off of inkjet transfers. I saw some the other day in the craft store that looked pretty good though, so I might try again. The difference between an iron and a press is immense. But I bought a cheap press off of eBay and regretted it, then I actually bought a not much more expensive press from sunie.com ($249 -$269 I think?). For the small volume I do, it works very well. Eventually I want the $1500 slide out MaxxPress... :)
You can start small, but by small I actually mean at least a $500 investment. That got me my cutter, software, some vinyl, shirts, and I used my iron for about a month. Then I spent more to get a press.
I troll the local discount stores for blanks, and have found cases of blank shirts that I've bought in bulk at Goodwill. You're a poor college student, that's good... If you ever want to get bigger, remember where you are now and buy smart; that way if you aren't successful you aren't in debt.
Good luck, and do your homework! (In school and in t-shirt making.)
 

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I run a small t-shirt shop here and I've used a hand iron from day one, which was about 9 months ago (we had a press but it didn't work). I've managed this shop most of the 9 months and have had no issues with the handheld iron and it even comes in handy for people who come in with custom shirts! (Polo's, button ups, work uniforms, hats, etc... stuff that you can't put in a press). All I can say is after you get the heat setting just right and you peel up the plastic, go by eyesight! You can tell which spots are on really good and which ones aren't, then all you do is lay the plastic back on and really work in the trouble spots. I've NEVER had a problem with this and never had a customer come back with a complaint and I think that says alot for how long I've been working there, although it greatly contradicts just about what everyone else on here is saying. It has worked for me. A little more of a PITA but it has served me well. Just my 2 cents, good luck buddy.
 

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Oh and P.S. "I used some Office Depot transfer sheets on a white tshirt and there ended up being a slightly visible white outline of the paper on the shirt (even though the shirt is white...). Does this happen with the better quality transfer sheets too?" Any transfer sheets you purchase will do that. If you're serious about getting started with this, SAVE YOUR MONEY and buy a vinyl cutter, not a heat press. Then you can cut your designs peel away the stuff you don't want and when you iron it on ONLY what you have cut will transfer. (this of course is for single-dual color designs, not multicolor) But it is the cheapest most effective and cleanest way to start your business. Then like I said, an iron will work great after you get a feel for how hot, how long to press down, and how good/even it looks when you're done. Otherwise you're stuck with that outline buddy and trust me people don't want to buy that.
 

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Really silly question. I wanted to do iron on for 2 sisters turning 50 this yr, bought the shirts and Averry Transfer. I can't figure out how to reverse the writing so it prints on shirt correctly?
I'm near starting my own line, this is just 2 shirts I wanted for personal..thanks. N
 

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Really silly question. I wanted to do iron on for 2 sisters turning 50 this yr, bought the shirts and Averry Transfer. I can't figure out how to reverse the writing so it prints on shirt correctly?
I'm near starting my own line, this is just 2 shirts I wanted for personal..thanks. N
Nancy, if you are working in Photoshop, you go to Image>Image Rotation>Flip Canvas Horizontal.
 
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