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SlogoMogul said:
I have seen people comment that corel draw is easier to use for a novice than illustrator. But does this apply to someone creating simple designs like I described above? If corel draw is the EASIER of the two, are there disadvantages to using it?
I have Coreldraw X3 and it's great. As Greg mentioned, it's easy to save your file in the correct format for your printer. You can save it in practically any file type imaginable.

It is a relatively easy process to make simple graphics as you described. However, as with any graphics software, there is always a learning curve. I have found that the Corel "Help" interface is very intuitive, it brings up new tips for you according to what you are doing (and it is not annoying, like the Microsoft paperclip guy). Also, there is a nice set of tutorials on one of the CDs, which give step-by-step video instruction on various basic tasks.

Here's an in-depth article that explains some of the features and differences between Coreldraw, Illustrator and other graphics programs:

http://www.corel.com/content/pdf/cgsx3/press/tech_biz_aus_feb06.pdf
 

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SlogoMogul said:
I think I will take the 15 day trial. One more quick question...I am a college student(until Dec 13th) and saw that corel draw was priced significantly less for students....is the student software the same as the full priced? If not, will it be sufficient? Thanks everyone, Tony


I could be wrong, but I think the downloadable trial does not come with the paper manuals. The academic version doesn't have any manuals, and I believe it also doesn't come with the fonts, video tutorials, and other little "extras". Also, I think the academic version can't be upgraded in the future. You should check out the Corel website for more info.
 
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