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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Went and met with my screenprinting guy yesterday. I've always used Photoshop for graphics, but after him giving me a quick Corel tutorial, I can see where it is much easier to use for t-shirt design.

I've been playing with it today, trying to recreate the designs that I've spent the last week creating in Photoshop. It's definitely different!
 

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It's brilliant. Give yourself some time to get your head around it.

I had years on Photoshop before I was obliged to use CorelDraw. I heart Photoshop. :)

Now for work I use CorelDraw 95% of the time and just drop into Photoshop to tweak the odd graphic before importing it back into Corel.

They are both excellent programmes, they just do different things very well.
 

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Big differnce. With Photoshop you are limited to working with bitmaps. CorelDRAW is very flexible. You can work both vector and bitmap within CorelDRAW. The vector portion is a lot easier than Illustrator. If you have to work more detail with bitmap you can transition to Photopaint within CorelDRAW.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Lol, yeh, some things are ok, some are like whoa!! I wanted to curve some text today and it took me FOREVER to get it looking even half right. But that's because in Corel there's not a button that will do it for me :)
 

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The takeaway lesson here is that it is far easier to create typical T-shirt art using a VECTOR program than a bitmap program. CorelDRAW and Adobe Illustrator are vector programs; Photoshop is a bitmap program, and is just not the correct type of tool for most T-shirt art.

As to which vector program to use, well there are a number of tools that will do the job, from CorelDraw and Illustrator to free open source tools. You can download a free trial of most (all?) of the tools, and that is the best way to see which you prefer. There is no one "best" tool for everyone, as everyone has their own likes and dislikes and ways of working that will better fit with one tool than another.

That said, I have used both Corel and Adobe products since the early 1990s, often with no choice in the matter as the tool was selected by my employer. Both companies have their shortcomings, but personally I prefer Corel's interfaces and business practices over Adobe--only Microsoft manages to piss me off more than Adobe! Hey, but that's me. Try before you buy and see what you like. They will all get the job done once you learn how to use them.
 

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For me Illustrator is like being in "heaven" and Corel is like that "fiery" place...Started with Illustrator, went to Corel for a decade and now back to Illustrator....
Well it is the other way around with my experience using both. I have CS2 that was free at Adobe.com. It is just nowhere near CorelDRAW in my opinion. I started from ver. 3 all the way up to X5 and loving it. I write macro codes in CorelDRAW which is one of the benefits I like and more.
 

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It's horses for courses really.

If you want to create a graphic that can be printed as a tiny crest on a polo shirt one minute and the side of a bus the next, and then they change the colour of the polo shirt and the colour of the bus? no problem, no loss of fidelity, perfect scaling - CorelDraw.

Now if you want to take a photo of your favourite aunt, put her in fishnet stockings and stick her in a lap dancing club for a laugh - Photoshop. :D
 
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