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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an interesting dilemma. A while back I took a stab at having a comic book artist do an exclusive design for me.

Now I own the design and have done some successful prints of the artwork. It's an underbase white with 6 other screens. It is a very intense, high detail piece on 305's. The underbase is on a 195 mesh, but I digest.

Now, I have been contacted by a supplier who distributes to comicbook stores world wide. They are interested in what I am doing and want to know what I want to charge for the shirt, essentially placing my company in their catalogue.

My question is: what do you think is a fair wholesale price for this item?

I print them myself in my garage so there is no outsourcing. I just don't want to screw myself out of money, I know that the comic shops will want to charge 20 to 25 bucks per shirt.

Anyone have any thoughts on what a reasonable price would be so that I am getting maximum profits and they are happy with their costs?
 

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Generally, retailers double their wholesale cost to come up with a retail price. If they will be selling your shirts for $25, you should look in the $12.50 range. BUT, make sure your costs to produce this shirt, PLUS an industry standard 100% markup, does not exceed this figure. If it does, maybe you should consider selling it for more.
 

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2x is a rule of thumb only, and I'm not sure I'd worry about it in this case.

You're selling to a distributor who is selling to a wholesale purchaser who is selling retail. If you were to follow the 2x formula you'd actually be selling at 1/4 retail. Your cost would need to be 1/8 retail - or $3.12 on a $25 shirt.

But as a middleman who doesn't carry stock the distributor doesn't necessarily want 2x markup. And as a non-clothing retailer the comic book stores could go in any direction (they may not need 100% markup as it's just a side line to add diversity, or conversely they may want more than 100% because they don't move many units).

I wouldn't really worry about who will be sellling for what, other than yourself. Work out what you need to sell it for, and tell them that's the price. They'll work out whether or not that works for them.

If you charge the price you need to be charging, there's nothing to beat yourself up over if that price doesn't work for them.
 

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If there are many middlemen in your supply chain, your order size is going to be large. Likely be in size of hundreds a time. Will you be able to print them all single handed in your garage?

Your distributor may have experience bundling t-shirt before so they are the best person who to give you an idea on the order size and frequency coming to you once your items are listed on their catalog. With their projected figure you can then plan your production framework and then know the costing.
 
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