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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am wanting to start customizing and printing small amounts of shirts, I have an HP all in one printer, and right now I have no heat press, just using an iron. I can get the transfer on, but they crack when worn or washed and I am not sure what is causing this or what all I need to have. Do not know the best paper, if they make the suitable ink for HP printers, etc... any advice would be really wonderful, trial and error has become discouraging! I would really appreciate it!
 

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Hi there, to be honest with you that is the typical behavior of iron-on transfers. I know you may not be able to but if you can I really suggest investing in a quality heat press.

I haven't seen our forum member, Muncheys, post in a while but he would be perfect for answering this. He started with an iron and later upgraded to a heat press.

Maybe someone else will know of a better transfer paper for ironing, wish I could have been more help.

Welcome to the forums anyway!
 

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First off, :welcome:

You can find lots of help with heat pressing and heat transfers in the Heat Press Section of our forum here: http://www.t-shirtforums.com/forumdisplay.php?f=15

Browsing through some of the recent discussions on that page should give you some great information on printers/inks/papers to use.

You can also use the forum search feature, and search for the keywords: paper or best or printer or inks to find past topics that could answer your question.

I think what you're looking for is pigment ink, which may or may not be available for your HP. Which HP model do you have?

Also, you won't get good results at all using a hand iron. From the threads I've read (and I'm no heat press expert), you'll need to get a professional heat press machine that will give you consistent pressure and temperature to get a quality looking heat transfer.

I think I read somewhere about a paper called "iron-all" that is supposed to work ok with an iron.

Maybe someone else with more experience will be able to help more.

Again, welcome to the forums!
 

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There is a paper called MiraCool that will work with either, a heat press or an iron. Even it works better with a heat press though. You can get it at www.personalizedsupplies.com . However as Rodney said, a heat press will make a much more professional looking image.

To test any ink, after pressing, soak the shirt and lay it in the bath tub, fold the image over onto the balnk part of the shirt and press it down with your hands. Let it sit for about 30 minutes. Unfold it and see if the colors have bled. If they did then they will do the same thing in the wash.

God Bless You
Don
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks to all of you for your posts and welcomes. :) Do any of you have any ideas on where I could find an inexpensive but quality heat press? I am mainly doing youth tees, so I wouldn't need anything too large. I have washed all of my practice shirts, none of them have bled, the image on the front has just cracked, in wash as well as during wear. So I am assuming that means my ink is ok? I have also read some posts about using teflon, not really sure what that is about? I am assuming getting a heat press and proper paper will help the cracking of the images. I would appreciate any additional tips or advice! Thanks again!
 

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Do any of you have any ideas on where I could find an inexpensive but quality heat press?
What is "inexpensive" to you? Do you have a price range in mind?

Some places also offer payment plans (lease to own). If you plan on doing this more and more, you might end up expanding beyond youth tees, so it might be good to start off with the right stuff.

I've heard of people finding deals on craigslist, ebay, and even by calling around to local printers.
 

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Just to reemphasize what is being said. You definitely will get better results with a commercial grade heat press over an iron or homemade heat press. Heat transfers in general are very reliant on specific times, temperatures & pressures. A quality heat press will deliver these very accurately, while making your life a lot easier. Price ranges on commercial grade heat presses start at about $395.
 
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