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What's a T-Jet 3 plus??? Unless US Screen has brought the TJet 3 back into production, this model was discontinued for the Blazer. This may be machines that are "reconditioned", with some new features added. We had 2 Tjet 3's last year, both failed within 90 days, and we finally got our money back. It's a model that US Screen had many problem with. Take care, use caution, and make sure you have some type of long term warranty (more than 30 or 60 days) in writing. Also, what company is selling this model? Are they authorized to provide PROPER support?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The Fast T-Jet3 PLUS is a slightly used refurbished printer that work and run just like new. They have been gone over by our experienced techs and have new print heads, new bulk systems, FastRIP/FastARTIST, new ink, and a six month warranty. With our new and improved Motion Control board the machine is very smooth, prints excellent registration with no banding, and a re-design of the bulk ink delivery system means a very consistent ink flow. We have worked hard to re-design the control mechanism making the T-Jet3 PLUS a very reliable machine!
 

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So in layman terms, they are the ones that were returned or bought back and they upgraded them to now work? lol
 

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The Fast T-Jet3 PLUS is a slightly used refurbished printer that work and run just like new. They have been gone over by our experienced techs and have new print heads, new bulk systems, FastRIP/FastARTIST, new ink, and a six month warranty. With our new and improved Motion Control board the machine is very smooth, prints excellent registration with no banding, and a re-design of the bulk ink delivery system means a very consistent ink flow. We have worked hard to re-design the control mechanism making the T-Jet3 PLUS a very reliable machine!
Is this machine refurbished by US Screen, or another copmany? Who backs the warranty, and provides support?
 

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I would just make sure to do your research on each machine, and make sure you make the best decision for yourself. If you do a search here on the different machines, you will find a ton of information. Hope this helps :)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
it seems like every machine has a problem leaving it up to the people on the form. i just really wanna get a machine and print off all colors of shirts
 

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it seems like every machine has a problem leaving it up to the people on the form. i just really wanna get a machine and print off all colors of shirts
Yes, each machine has it's own set of issues. Unfortunately, there is no one machine that can do it all perfectly. Like I said in previous postings, this industry is still learning & maturing. There are several systems out there that will do what you're looking for: printing on all colors of shirts....just be prepared for a long learning curve, lots of time getting to know your system, and lots of trial & error. I think the "jury is still out" on the TJet 3 Plus model.....I would wait & see if others purchase it, and how well they fair out with it. I like the idea of a few machines that offer the ability to start out w/ dual CMYK, printing on lite shirts, and then upgrade to the white ink feature. Gives you time to learn the system without all the extensive maintenance associated with white ink, sell a few shirts, get to know the RIP software, and then move up to the white ink & dark shirts after you're very comfortable with everything else, and have successfully printed & sold some lite shirts.
 

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I like the idea of a few machines that offer the ability to start out w/ dual CMYK, printing on lite shirts, and then upgrade to the white ink feature. Gives you time to learn the system without all the extensive maintenance associated with white ink, sell a few shirts, get to know the RIP software, and then move up to the white ink & dark shirts after you're very comfortable with everything else, and have successfully printed & sold some lite shirts.
I firmly believe for 95% of the industry, this is absolutely the way to go if you are dead set on getting a printer that does white ink. There are really two learning curves: 1) getting to know the basics of the machine, inks and CMYK curing; 2) getting to know the pretreatment, white ink and curing. I have seen too many times where people start off with white ink in the printer and are not able to grasp everything fast enough before they become fustrated with the process or have to begin replacing parts on their printer for improper maintenance. Some people go into it thinking they have to have white ink and later realize that it is not profitable for their business model. If you start off using the printer as a CMYK setup (whether Dual CMYK or CMYK+Cleaning Fluid), you will know how easy it is to use these printers and will be able to master the maintenance / software side of CMYK printing quickly. Then you can begin to tackle the white ink side of the business. Some companies just can't get down the art of white ink printing and will then want to switch back to CMYK. I always tell people that they need plan for the worst and if this means being able to get the correct ROI out you want with running the printer just as a CMYK setup...than that is what you need to do.

For the other 5% of the industry that is just going to require printing white ink right away, spend the money to get the manufacturer or distributor training. The time, misprint shirts and replacement parts will add up fastly if you don't get the necessary training. All the aspects of dtg printing are definitely unique... but they can be done successfully if you fully understand the process and are willing to take the time to learn the art.

Wish everyone the best in their decision making process.

Mark
 

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Mark is correct. On all the brands there is a learning curve. I know my staff and I try very hard to emphasize that to all potential customers of our printers. You need to spend time learning to operate these machines. Of course, we always get a few calls each month from potential customers asking if there's any way to get a printer to them by Friday because they need to print an order over the weekend and deliver it on Monday. It takes a little effort to convince them that it's not a good idea. It is a great idea when starting out to set up the printer to only print CMYK. On all brands you can just fill the bottles or cartridges holding the white ink with cleaning fluid instead (never run with the bottles empty). When you've perfected your CYMK printing learning curve you just empty out the cleaning fluid, put in the white ink, and you're ready for the white ink curve.

Harry
 

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Discussion Starter #17
ok so what's the difference in the t-jet3 plus? cause you guys never had it on your site cause i'm on that site everyday
 

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Before you invest in a t-jet do some research on how long it takes to print a shirt. I just traded my t-jet -2 in on a brother 541. if you want to print on dark colors you must pretreat your shirts. You then have to press the shirt to set the pretreatment. Oh you probably should press it before you pretreat it to be sure it is nice and flat so the treatment goes on even. Now you will load the shirt in the machine. Print a base coat of white. Well I found you had to print 2 coats of base coat white in many cases. Then you can print the colors. I also found that to get bright colors two passes are nessesary also. After you print the shirt you press it for two min. to set the color. To make a long story short I was taking up to 8 or 9 min. to do one shirt. the brother will not print on dark shirts. But the first shirts I ran took 50 sec to print two sides. 35 sec. to heatpress. In short I can do 40 or 50 shirts an hour compaired to 6 or seven. Here is what I found . I can make more money doing light color shirts and if you must have dark shirts use a transfer or sub the shirt to a screenprinter.
 
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