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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone know how? The diner mug is the thick-walled mug with the concave outside. Some of the online mug factories do it, but I don's ever see diner-mug blanks for mug presses. Clearly, flat paper won't rest properly on a curved surface, so my assumption is that this cannot be done with special equipment (i.e., maybe flexible "paper" and a concave wrap). Just curious if anyone knows about this.


Diner mug image:
https://www.bing.com/images/search?...08004175825273807&selectedIndex=15&ajaxhist=0
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Really! The vacuum process makes sense... but how would one wrap the dye-sub paper around a concave surface? Even doing a logo on just one side of a mug would require paper being taped on, and flat paper on a concave surface would mean wrinkles and such... at least I assume.
 

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At first, your mug should be coated, you should also prepare a printer, sublimation ink, heat transfer paper, thermal tape and 3D vacuum heat press, then you can begin your sublimation your mug. If you have any questions, you can ask me, we are a professional manufacturer in sublimation blanks and customization.
 

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I'm no expert, but the way I'd tackle printing a concave mug (assuming I could obtain a suitable coated blank) would be to use sublimation film rather than paper and use a heat-shrink wrap instead of a silicone wrap or mug press.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'm no expert, but the way I'd tackle printing a concave mug (assuming I could obtain a suitable coated blank) would be to use sublimation film rather than paper and use a heat-shrink wrap instead of a silicone wrap or mug press.

Webtrekker, thanks -- really brand new to this, just began doing mugs in the past two weeks. I am unfamiliar with sublimation film. Does that work in a typical dye-sub printer? We have the Sawgrass SG800.


My head-scratching is that printing on paper means there's no way to wrap flat paper around a mug that is convex. All the samples that I see on the online mug-customization sites don't show wrapped images but logos or smaller pics on one side of the mug. MAYBE that would reduce the challenges, but it just seems like it would still wrinkle, bend, etc., and leave marks in the image.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
At first, your mug should be coated, you should also prepare a printer, sublimation ink, heat transfer paper, thermal tape and 3D vacuum heat press, then you can begin your sublimation your mug. If you have any questions, you can ask me, we are a professional manufacturer in sublimation blanks and customization.

Zoomsub, thanks. I'm just stuck on trying to understand how to wrap flat paper around a concave surface. Just doesn't seem viable! Webtrekker suggested sublimation film, which I am unfamiliar with but about to go research. A vacuum sublimation machine makes sense in order to apply consistent pressure, but the problem of a wrinkled paper/etc. would seem to be an issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I'm no expert, but the way I'd tackle printing a concave mug (assuming I could obtain a suitable coated blank) would be to use sublimation film rather than paper and use a heat-shrink wrap instead of a silicone wrap or mug press.

Webtrekker, thanks again... a quick search regarding sublimation film seems to have begun educating me! I appreciate the direction.
 

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I think the mug the OP was interested in curves in two directions, like a saddle, so most sublimation papers would be out of the question. Personally though, I'd steer clear of mugs of that shape myself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I think the mug the OP was interested in curves in two directions, like a saddle, so most sublimation papers would be out of the question. Personally though, I'd steer clear of mugs of that shape myself.

Yes -- like the image I've attached here... sort of hourglass-shaped all the way around. I tried various paper sizes and a small logo on one side MIGHT work... but anything large, particularly that wraps around, is just not going to work.


I have not found suppliers in the U.S. yet, but then I haven't scoured for them because I need to know what I have to do in order to even do these. The big companies have them, but they probably order straight from China.
 

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but they probably order straight from China
Maybe, but they are easy to make anywhere. They are are basically normal mugs but powder-coated.


Anyway, I'm yet to see one having a full edge-to-edge image sublimated. I't cannot be done, because paper does not stretch that much. For small images normal paper will work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Regular sub paper can be used on curved items.

Latte & Espresso Mugs - Drinkware & Mugs - Imprintables

[media]http://www.laserreproductions.com/media/infortis/instructions/LatteMugs.pdf[/media]

http://www.laserreproductions.com/media/infortis/templates/Template-16oz-Latte-Mug.psd

Not like a diner mug. Those are angled; diner mugs are curved inward at the middle. With an angled latte mug, you still have straight sides, so the paper is curving in only one direction. With a diner mug, you're curving the paper around the mug but also have to curve it inward. That's where the whole thing comes apart. Here's a pic of a diner mug... shaped like an hourglass:
 

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Not like a diner mug. Those are angled; diner mugs are curved inward at the middle. With an angled latte mug, you still have straight sides, so the paper is curving in only one direction. With a diner mug, you're curving the paper around the mug but also have to curve it inward. That's where the whole thing comes apart. Here's a pic of a diner mug... shaped like an hourglass:
Thanks for the clarification, I didn't read the original posting well enough.

Yes, those would require a film that is more easily shaped.
 

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The films work with vacuum, and cannot see an efficient way to do it with this mug. So far, all the ones I've seen printed have a fairly small print, which can be done with paper.
 
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