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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been dealing with basic printing with my screenprinter. But now we have run into a problem...how do people print on the side, above the collar, sleeves or entire shirt prints.
He cant do prints that go up along the collar because the screen lifts slightly and the ink become thicker and doesnt look as great. I was wondering if there are any tips on how to print like that or if anyone knows a site or screenprinters in the US that can print entire image shirts or more un-centered images.
Any information would be very helpful or new ways to print uncentered images. I cant find anywhere to find printers that print more advanced printing.

Thanks Alot,
Matt
Atara Clothing
 

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Those types of print are usually done before the garment is sewn. I'd look into finding someone to make the garment after yuo've printed the fabric. Good Luck!!
 

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Look for a belt printer or someone that has large pallets that can handle the entire shirt. There are also some attachements available to print off the sleeve. Impressions usually features some Golden Squeegee printers that are accomplished.
 

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I was able to accomplish this pretty easily for printing over seams. on top of your platten, you can place a piece of foam board, and wherever the seam is, you can carve a slight line out. you dont want to carve to deep or when you squeegie it will press the seam in and not print on it, just a little bit so that it can lay even and still have something to support it from behind. not sure how this will work with shirts on different sizes, but I was dl this all the time for the bella boyshorts and pants - it works great!
 

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Just use the right ink, and printing over seams is a tiny hassle.

Thinned plastisol works great. dishcharge, water based ink as well.

Also if you have a rag, or paper towel, you can dab the spots that are gunky, before you cure it. if using plastisol. {Use a new part of the rag/towel everytime! or else you spread ink everywhere, }

I hate to say it, but the limitations faced with your current printer would not even be considerations with a more skilled/ setup printer.

Cheers!
 

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Just use the right ink, and printing over seams is a tiny hassle.

Thinned plastisol works great. dishcharge, water based ink as well.

Also if you have a rag, or paper towel, you can dab the spots that are gunky, before you cure it. if using plastisol. {Use a new part of the rag/towel everytime! or else you spread ink everywhere, }

I hate to say it, but the limitations faced with your current printer would not even be considerations with a more skilled/ setup printer.

Cheers!
I would have to disagree to a point. I have tried waterbased, plastisol, and discharge over seams. I have tried putting rubber on top of the platen to let the seams sink down some to create more of an even level for printing. I have not carved grooves into my platens yet, only because they would not work for different size shirts. Even on Design by Humans who seem to be able to print almost any design, you can see inconsistencies over seams/collars. The most success I have had is printing on custom made shirts that had thin seams along the shoulders.
 

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Every single screenprint has inconsistencies, unless printed by a robot/auto press. It all depends on how close you examine them.

I have printed over the seam many times, and had many many happy customers. Every single time I warned them that there are certain issues, and inconsistencies with printing over seams. They agreed and we moved on, both happy. {Just like over the zipper prints. Its TOUGH to get those perfect evrytime} With enough care, skill and equipment, you can almost eliminate all of the little issues with this type of printing.

i will totally admit that the consistency wavers a bit. Just like a regular printing job, once you "get in the groove" the shirts will come off the press almost perfectly.

The best bet is to practice, experiment and learn how to print more difficult techniques. Once you master it, you are proud to offer it to your clients.

Good luck!
 

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Discharge is the key to over the seam prints. Our shop has been doing it and the shirts look great. I was surprised at how easy it was actually. Once you ace using discharge, the seams are a breeze.
 
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