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I already have a heat press. I have tried a few designs of my own and the problem is the white paper left around the design go on the t-shirt to. Is there a way to keep this from happening? Is there any special paper or equipment I can get so only the design ends up on the t-shirt? Thanks for the help.
 

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There are alot of posts on this site about that. I can't give exact advice because I too am just learning, but from what I have read . . .

You need to trim 1/8" or as close as possible around your image, or in your design editing program "fake" it out by adding a background of the same color as your shirt around your image (also only 1/8") and then trim around it.
 

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dawn20 said:
I already have a heat press. I have tried a few designs of my own and the problem is the white paper left around the design go on the t-shirt to. Is there a way to keep this from happening? Is there any special paper or equipment I can get so only the design ends up on the t-shirt? Thanks for the help.
you're kidding right ?
you don't like the border ?

at my compare a shirt club meets, every one loves the borders. It makes it so color jet/clc authentic. If it dosent have a border it's passe. :)

nah, just kiddin.
please do have a read, there are lot of threads by a young t-shirt enterperneur "Lou" that knows everything about that first hand.

Enjoy your stay.

oh, yeah. Welcome. :D
 

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Sounds like you may be using opaque transfer papers. If this is the case, there is no way to get rid of the white excess save trimming it off completely (which is part of the reason I never use them).

If you're using regular heat transfers, what color shirt are you transfering on to? The translucent white border will show through on some color shirts, but should not on white or ash if you trim the transfer before applying it.
 

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by a young t-shirt enterperneur "Lou" that knows everything about that first hand.
Young, yeah, I wish.. but really if you are doing hot peel on light shirts you need to trim it to 1/8 aroung the design. Opaque tranfers are different. Can trip right up to your design but if they are letters it is a pain in the lou..cee. Please feel free to look at my cideos and send $5.00 to my favorite charity.. me.. LOL when all else fail.. laugh.. badalouism #39590
 

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Sure, laugh at old people... what's next!! people who burn themselves with presses ? Oh wait.. that's right baby.. you.. now who is joke on.. yeah, not laughing now eh!!! Sure you see an old guy running down the street with no clothes on holding his Iron all transfer to his nose and you think its funny.. it's not! it is disease.. I am checking myself in to TSA.. Transfer Sniffers of a America. yeah and for you Lucy in sky with diamonds I head you burnt you scalp trying to press your hair on your press... now that's sick.
 

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Hi, I had the same problem until I bought a vinyl cutter that has an optic eye and can trim the transfers after printing. I use a Craftrobo and it also has a neat set of tools for tracing a design and then it will trim the excess before pressing. You can find posts about this topic on here and if you need to check out the CR then go to craftrobostore.com and read the info there. Hope this helps.
 

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adamski... said:
whats the difference between a hot peel and opague transfer? please excuse my ignorance im new to this :)
"Hot peel" describes how quickly you peel the transfer from the shirt after you lift the press up. Hot peel transfers must be pulled off immediately; Cold peel transfers must cool off for a little bit before you peel them from the shirt.


Opaque transfers, on the other hand, are transfers designed to work on all colors of t-shirts. This is different than regular heat transfers (I don't know if regualr transfers have a specific name like 'opaque' does), which only work well on light-colored shirts.

With opaque transfers, EVERYTING is transfered to the shirt - this includes any white 'border' left behind the image. Opaque transfers also tend to feel thicker, having a 'rubbery' feel to them.

With regular transfers, it's partially see through (or translucent). This means they won't work on dark colors (the color of the shirt will show through too much), so you can generally only use them on white or ash t-shirts (some people do other very light colors as well, such as light yellows). They feel fairly soft, but usually not as soft as screen printing (this will vary with the specific transfer paper used).

Some people (including myself) feel that the quality of opaque transfers isn't good enough to be used at all, while others specifically persue that rubbery feel (some customers like it).
 

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thanks alot for your help Twinge. now can you use the same type of ink for regular transfers and opaque transfers? or do they use different inks? sounds like it is good to have the option of using differnt types of transfers depending on the job at hand.
 

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have you used the exact print papers? I'm looking into getting started with making my own transfers. as of now i do vinyl,rhinestones and sublimation. I'm looking for a good printer and good papers as well. I'd also like to use the foils that can be used with exact print. Any suggestions?
 
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