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That depents on the fabric you are working with. Also is it depending on the backing you are using. Also is there a difference in threads, one is thicker then the other one. And ofcourse it depends on the stitchlength.

I have an embroidery company for 14 years now and have seen a lot in change regarding fabrics but also logo's.

Satin stitch, big stitches 3.0 smaller stitches 4.0-5.0
Step satin, 3.0 and length 35 for bigger fields 3.5 and 35.

This is roughly what you can use, we use madeira isacord 40.

Hope this helps.

Take care.
 

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Different embroidery programs can use different meanings as well. 3.0 fill density on one program may look like it's stitching every other line so you kind of need to compare apples to apples.

When I first started embroidery work, I always assumed I needed to add more density. I've (slowly!) learned that's usually not the case and adding more underlay not only fixes the problem but the design stitches out much flatter. There are some guidelines you can find on the web but ultimately it's up to you to come up with the numbers that work for your software, machine and fabric.
 

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Underlay, you always have to use underlay. This will get the stretch out of the product and therefor will make the upper layer more beautifull.

For fabrics that dont have stretch, like thick jackets, dont use underlayer.

When using underlayer dont make the mistake to put it only in one way. This will distort your upper layer. For instance: you embroider a square. When your fill stitch runs from left to right and you put only one angle (45 degrees) underthreat your square will not be a square anymore, because the underthreat stretches the fabric only to one side. It is better to put two angels, 135 and 45 with a fill between 50-75. This will pull and stretch both ways wich results in a more better design.

Good luck!
 

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As was mentioned above, underlay is merely to stabilize the fabric and provide a foundation for the top stitches. This is where the push/pull compensation is taken care of for the fabric type, and also to help with densities. Proper digitizing also prevents the push pull effect by changing stitch angles/ lengths, and by not sewing a design from one side to the other. Most, but not all, of the companies that charge by the stitch count for digitizing, could care less about putting more underlay to minimize top stitch count. They have no incentive to do so. For me, a density of 4(the industry standard) is about as heavy as I ever go. With proper underlay, 4.5 will cover pretty well and not make the design seem bulletproof(meaning heavy and thick like a bulletproof vest). No two digitizers do things the same though, and you have to learn what is best for you.
 

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As was mentioned above, underlay is merely to stabilize the fabric and provide a foundation for the top stitches. This is where the push/pull compensation is taken care of for the fabric type, and also to help with densities. Proper digitizing also prevents the push pull effect by changing stitch angles/ lengths, and by not sewing a design from one side to the other. Most, but not all, of the companies that charge by the stitch count for digitizing, could care less about putting more underlay to minimize top stitch count. They have no incentive to do so. For me, a density of 4(the industry standard) is about as heavy as I ever go. With proper underlay, 4.5 will cover pretty well and not make the design seem bulletproof(meaning heavy and thick like a bulletproof vest). No two digitizers do things the same though, and you have to learn what is best for you.
Thank you, yes I sent my logo to somecompany to digitized, and when I tried to do my logo on a polo it was like you said a bulletproof, it was very thick, it look ugly.
 
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