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We've done 5000+ decals in one month and it has been more than 3 months now. It's still cutting just fine although we need to use about 10g more in down force. We usually do a test cut pattern right before a big job. If it doesn't cut cleanly then we replace the blade. Also, we stock up about 5 blades of each, 60 & 45 degrees.
 

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Vtec44 said:
We've done 5000+ decals in one month and it has been more than 3 months now. It's still cutting just fine although we need to use about 10g more in down force. We usually do a test cut pattern right before a big job. If it doesn't cut cleanly then we replace the blade. Also, we stock up about 5 blades of each, 60 & 45 degrees.
What difference does 60 vs. 45 degrees make?
 

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From what I was told years ago, 45-degree blades are good for small intricate details and 60-degree blades are good for providing smooth straight lines. We usually use 60-dgree blades for everything, including complex designs. I found that you can play with the down force and speed to compensate for the angle. We have a CAMM1 Pro CX-400.
 

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Ive had my plotter for about 2 years now and have cut near all of 5 20 yard rolls of sign vinyl, 5 yards of flock and just finished my third 20 yard roll of garment vinyl and the cuts are easily as clean as the day I started. The real trick is set the blade to proper depth. From what I can tell, all plotters, the blade holder is user adjustable. Having the blade too deep can do damage to the blade, cut into the cutter strip and tear up you material. The 2 cutters Ive set up had very good guides on how each machine needs to be done.
 

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Dave is right on with his assessment...it all depends on cutting at the proper depth. A 45 degree blade is good for most materials. You need to make the switch to 60 degree blades when you move into thicker material such as flock. When you make the change, you should also change your offset to a .6 or .65 because the turning radius of the blade changes and your corners will not be as sharp if you don't. For most materials, your blade tip should never extend from the holder more than the thickness of a credit card. At that depth, you should have maximum control from your cutter's control panel to adjust speed and pressure for your material and your blades can experience their maximum life expectancy which I would estimate at 500 to 1000 yards of material cut.
 

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...I guess with material jams thats when you lose a blade or 2!

another reason why not so good material (like that supreme-extra sticky stuff) is a bad purchase choice.

I must say that Thermoflex™ is the best for moi. :) ...not too sticky. Yep, the blades do last. Stalhs sells blades, any others selling good blades ?
 
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