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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I understand that the Rip software takes over as your printer driver and turns shading into halftone dots, tells the printer to lay down a thicker coat of ink, ect.

What else does it do? Can you do color separations with it? Add choke or trap to a color? Or do you need more software on top of the RIP program to do that?
 

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That is what Raster Image Processors do. The issue is what features does your RIP come with. Many higher end RIPs come with all the bells and whistles, where lower end RIPs are more limited. In my paper print world I have spent as much as $20,000 on a hardware RIP to get the high end advanced features. You also need to check your software that you are printing from. Programs like Adobe InDesign have built in features that assist your RIPing so you can separate from the application as you print. I have always told the operators that work for me the best thing to do is experiment with the different applications and printing devices and see what works best for them. You can also try poking around in your printer user manuals and help files to see if they give any information on what your printer RIP has to offer. I hope this helps.
 

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That is what Raster Image Processors do. The issue is what features does your RIP come with. Many higher end RIPs come with all the bells and whistles, where lower end RIPs are more limited. In my paper print world I have spent as much as $20,000 on a hardware RIP to get the high end advanced features. You also need to check your software that you are printing from. Programs like Adobe InDesign have built in features that assist your RIPing so you can separate from the application as you print. I have always told the operators that work for me the best thing to do is experiment with the different applications and printing devices and see what works best for them. You can also try poking around in your printer user manuals and help files to see if they give any information on what your printer RIP has to offer. I hope this helps.
Do you like hardware rips? I have an epson one, I don't care for it myself. But it could just be preference/my needs/brand etc. Is there anything really great about them?

It's my foot rest now, actually.
 

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I like hardware RIPs for certain types of work like variable data printing. You really need to evaluate on a case by case basis. With the current speed of desktop computers a hardware RIP is normally not necessary for general printing. You have to understand my first printer was a letterpress so I have seen allot of changes in the printing industry (boy I feel old just typing this :)). So I guess what I'm saying is evaluate what your end product is going to be and then find the best way to get there. You'll probably find that a good software RIP is all you need.
 

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RIP's just communicate with the printer. They'll help create half tone dots and get the density correct for the film. You'll need an art program like adobe photoshop, illustrator or Corel draw to do the seps, choke and trap etc...
I use adobe photoshop and Illustrator for the seps and Wasatch SP for the RIP with an Epson 4800 .
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
RIP's just communicate with the printer. They'll help create half tone dots and get the density correct for the film. You'll need an art program like adobe photoshop, illustrator or Corel draw to do the seps, choke and trap etc...
I use adobe photoshop and Illustrator for the seps and Wasatch SP for the RIP with an Epson 4800 .
I own Adobe Illustrator. I just don't know how to do much with it yet.
 
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