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Discussion Starter #1
I was wondering how much detail you can put in your artwork. I've been reading that as long as its vector based it should be good to go... now say i have a complex design...here is a font site with some fonts I want to use for some shirts (some of them have copyrights, i know this)

http://www.dafont.com/top.php

anyway do you see how it has a "grungy" feel to them?
the question is will they be able to reproduce the image the way it looks, or do they "simplify" it, as in fill in the white spots...

if this question is vague im sorry

k, thanx
 

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Stop listening to all the garbage you hear about the art needs to be vector. This is a misconception a lot in the industry have and is totally incorrect. Vector art is the easiest to work with and most prefer if, but it is not as far as being good to go, if you are using a quality artist/separator and pritner any art format as long as it is QUALITY shoulf work just fine.
Vector is good.
Raster is good as long as the resolution is high. 200-300 dpi at actual print size.

You can put a lot of detail in most art. the tpye of print, garment and ink color will come into play as to what mesh screen will need to be used and this will determine the amount of detail that can be held throughout the prepping process and print.

You would be amazed at what can be acheived if done properly.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thanx for the info.

the next question i have is how do they handle gradients?
2, 3, or 4 color gradients
 

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all those font styles would be no problem to reproduce using good quality plastisol transfers w/GLUE.

you can use various color percentages to achieve the look you need.

as long as your entire design is not micro-size :) , its all good.
 

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T-Bot when you say the good quality plastisol transfers w/ GLUE (GLUE being the keyword) what exactly do you mean? I understand how the plastisol transfers work (ie: you don't need to cut out the image, it can be directly heat pressed onto a shirt from the paper w/out any cutting) but what type and how is the glue used?

Thanks for the reply...

-JP
 

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the Glue (not adhesive Crystals) is done at manufacturing level when you order Custom Transfers.
They come ready to apply, you do nothing but apply them to shirts etc. really easy, 6-8 max press time and quick Hot Peel.

Only some transfer makers make them like that.

Hope this explains it. :)
 

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mrjaddd said:
I going to use spreadshirt... anyone do complex designs with spreadshirt?
the percentage stuff you want to do may not work with spreadshirt.
is that not what you want to do ? :confused:

spreadshirt requires solid art, 1-2-3 color i think. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
 

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Discussion Starter #9
well how about we just stick with one color black design on white shirt you think spreadshirt could handle that?
im thinkng about making a bunch of designs and putting them on one shirt and then submit them to spreadshirt for a test print...sound like a good idea?
 

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mrjaddd said:
well how about we just stick with one color black design on white shirt for now...
im thinkng about making a bunch of designs and putting them on the t-shirt to test out how they print out
oh i see. :rolleyes:

you know you can order the 1 color design/transfers in vinyls and flock alone, use your home iron and apply them to your own shirts Eh! ..... professional quality. :)

....but you know that already. Happy trails. :D


why not try cafe press, at least there you can go all out artistic.

the good thing about spreadshirt, is that you can sell 3 shirts and your buisness will be in the black.....Bwahahaha. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Its kind of hard for me to do things like that. I'm in the army and live in barracks... space is very limited.

do you know where i can get polo's make with my own design embroidered... la coste polo type deal.
 

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Nothing you send to an art department will be "simplified" as you say. And "fill in the white parts" is not industry standard (actually I've never heard of doing this). The only reasons a design will be simplified is
1. if you request it
2. if the screen printer or other type of printer is limited to a certain number of colors based on their equipment
3. to cut down on printing cost (with the customers okay)

Next question . . . gradient or fade out designs are usually printed as halftones - tiny dots of color that start out big and get smaller to fade the color out (darker = bigger dots, lighter = smaller / fewer dots).

You can't see these halftone "dots" on your computer screen. You just do the gradient effect as usual and print it out of a printer with POSTSCRIPT capabilities. The postscript is what tells the printer how to create the dots based on what is on your computer screen. Once out of the printer, you will see the gradient effect as bigger and smaller dots in decending order.

So, pretty much any fade out effect can be printed. Although you have to know how to adjust the print settings in your design software to work best with the printing technique you choose.

One more thing, those distressed fonts (which I love to print) are NOT considered complex. Complex is a very colorful design with small detail work and alot of different overlaps, etc. Pretty much all TEXT is considered easy.

Hope this helps!
 
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