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Hey Everyone,

I've been trying to get this effect with my tees, but it never quite comes out poppin'. My colors are all wrong. Does anyone know a color scheme that would work? My design is on a green American Apparel shirt (grass).

This type of design has been popular for quite sometime now. What exactly is this style called anyway? I'm guessing technicolor but I'm sure I'm wrong, lol.

Thanks...
 

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Most designs are simulated process colors or fake, others are simple spot colors.
For the simulated process you need to create a white underbase from a grayscale of the design, then the main colors and a highlight white.
Thanks,
Challenger
 

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it's really not a 3d image. i'm not sure what a technicolor design is. we use to call this a moire effect. challenger is correct with his break down of what you need to do to screenprint this.

you have some different color graphics in this design that are broken down into dots or halftones. others are solid. when you offset a halftone graphic from the same solid graphic it gives you that blurred look, as if the printer was not registering his print correctly. then you have the part of the design which is created by the halftone overlapping the solid part which creates another color. the designer is simply duplicating parts of his design, moving them ontop of/away from other of the same elements etc. experimenting till he gets it right.

we used to have to hand cut rubylith film and place halftone letraset film before the days of computers. we would use one size halftone (number of dots) on top of a different size haltone and turn it till it gave you a moire effect. so nice not to have to do that anymore. fun designs though. -peace.
 

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Do you need help with printing that type of design, or the process of getting the 3d effect?

I know that to get that 3d effect, it's not a matter of just overlaying red and blue. You actually have to have different angles of the red and blue, which means you need to make a device that will take a snapshot of the same image from different angles. Or some sort of 3d program that willl let you do this.
 

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you got me to look into exactly how the designer did what he did.......and by the way technicolor is not a bad way to describe the technique....just as i don't know if it's exactly a moire effect. just reminded me of back in the day and my boss yelling at me cuz that's really a mistake if you DON"T want that effect. a moire effect is when you take halftones and turn them a different angles on top of one another to give you a blurred effect.

but 3d has nothing to do with it. both illustrator and photoshop have this preset for you. select the layer with the artwork you want this effect then go up to the menu bar and under filter>pixelate>color halftone and play with the settings and hit ok. you'll have to play with the settings till you get what you want. but that designer duplicated a solid color layer and added that effect/filter to the duplicate then moved it offset to the side/top (whatever) to give it that blurred effect. once it's converted to a halftone you can move/tranform the layer like any other.

it's important to lock the layers you aren't working on when doing duplicates cuz you'll easily get confused and start editing things you don't want to.

one more thing. if you were to do a design like the one we've been discussing above: you have to think about what printing method you will use to produce the tshirt. silkscreening something like that would be tricky cuz they use different line screens. just think that those dots have to be printed without interruption and without bleed. exactly what size dots and their spread affect how your printer would set up the job. that would be a good question to ask a silkscreener on the forum. i'd like to know that myself. -peace.
 
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