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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I can't even believe I'm about to ask this. I should be flogged.

anyway.

Our 3 year birthday is coming up in a few days.
We've been BBB accredited since September.
We average about 300 shirts daily monday through saturday.
I flip about 75 screens a week.

and i have NEVER, I mean N.E.V.E.R. done an on press color change.

:eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek:

I use primarily roller frames on my manual press. and typically when clients want a color change, i just do two screens. one for each color. My screen making process is so dialed in, its just faster and easier to make another screen, than it is to stop production to perform a color change.

well, tomorrow I'm doing a job, that has 4 color front, 4 color back. AND they are doing a color change TWICE during the run. That'd be 24 screens. I have too many other jobs lined up tomorrow, to tie up 24 screens just because they want a color change.

I have a bottle of Franmar Color Change sitting here. it's just never been opened.

so... can't seem to find any definitive steps or even better, videos, on doing an onpress color change.

i would assume, card the ink, wipe down with color change, and apply new ink.

but i just know, i KNOW it can't be THAT easy.

any advise?

thanks :)
 

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The steps are exactly how you say, but it doesn't mean that it's that simple and easy. It can take a lot longer than most people think to do a color change when you aren't using the IR you would use when reclaiming.

I use press wash for my on press color changes.
card off all excess ink. Do a print or two to get as much out of the image area as possible.
Apply press wash and use rags to get all the ink off. I will also spray a rag and wash the shirt side at least once throughout the process. I reapply the wash as necessary and I keep going until there is as little color left on a newly used papertowels/rags as I feel is appropriate. IF I am going from an orange to a red having some color left isn't horrible. Even having a tiny bit of white left on the screen can make your next few prints or more much more muted in color.
I also start with the lightest color on the screens first then move to darkest. So White to black, yellow to red, green to purple, etc. Going from Black to another color you need to make sure you have all the ink removed or your next ink color will be tainted or even marbled for the first few prints.
hope that helps.
 

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card off all excess ink. Do a print or two to get as much out of the image area as possible.
Apply press wash and use rags to get all the ink off. I will also spray a rag and wash the shirt side at least once throughout the process. I reapply the wash as necessary and I keep going until there is as little color left on a newly used papertowels/rags as I feel is appropriate. IF I am going from an orange to a red having some color left isn't horrible. Even having a tiny bit of white left on the screen can make your next few prints or more much more muted in color.
I also start with the lightest color on the screens first then move to darkest. So White to black, yellow to red, green to purple, etc. Going from Black to another color you need to make sure you have all the ink removed or your next ink color will be tainted or even marbled for the first few prints.
hope that helps.
Pretty much exactly how I go about it too. Even from plastisol to discharge inks, or vice versa.
 
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