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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a picture which I designed in Photoshop that I need to vectorized with color separation to be screen printed.



I have followed this site CMYK Four Colour Screen Printing / PCS and turned it into this:



But then I don't know what to do next. How am I supposed to save it? What file format should I save? I don't even know if I'm doing the right thing.
 

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There is no need for a 4 color CMYK sep on this design. Use spot colors, two of them it looks like (white and red). If you are sending this to a screen printer you shouldn't have to separate it, just make sure it is a vector file and they should do the separations. Sometimes seps are specific to a press and even if you were to provide a separated file, the printer would still do their own seps... Some screen printers will charge you to do seps, but in my estimation they shouldn't, it should just be a part of the job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have a PSD file with all the layers in Photoshop, which file format should I save it to make it vector file? And by spot color, you mean something like my 2nd picture? Is it good enough if I give the printing that file?
 

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I am not an artist but you can google how to get it into a vector file, or you could ask your printer:

How to Convert a Layered PSD File to Vector Art | eHow.com

A spot color is a pantone color, like red or white in your design, the ink the printer prints is red or white.

With 4 color process, you're mixing the 4 fixed colors (cyan magenta yellow and black) to create the appearance of red, you're not actually mixing colors, you are putting those 4 different colors next to each other in tiny dot patterns that create the appearance of a color, not the actual color itself.
 

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@Shany if you're not doing the printing, then you shouldn't have to worry about separating the colors. The screen printer you work with will (should) do that.

As long as you have high resolution (200dpi at the size you want it printed) artwork, all you need to do is email that to the printer as a PSD file and they'll be able to take it from there and print your t-shirts.

If they need any changes, they'll be able to let you know. For example, if you created the design at a low dpi and then tried to resize it "up" in photoshop, that might make a pixellated image. You'd need to start you design at the high resolution blank canvas and design it from there.

If they are asking for a vector file, you can use a service like artworksource.com or vectordoctor.com and they can take your photoshop file and make it a vector file for usually under $20.
 
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