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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am constantly trying to improve my game. I saw a shirt the other day that had the most awesome print I have ever seen. I did some research and discovered it was printed by Industry Threadworks in San Diego.

It appears that it was printed with waterbase/discharge ink. It also seems that there is no underbase. I can do that on a cotton shirt... but this is obviously a 60/40 blend. I am thinking it is a Next Level 6210 or a Bella+Canvas 3001CVC.

Look how rich the colors are. And, I couldn't believe how soft it was. How did they do that? If anybody from that shop is out there and they want to share, it would be greatly appreciated!


 

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What brands do. you suggest. I am not getting that result with mine (on 60/40).
With a heather shirt, the poly will be white/clear, so no worries about the poly not discharging, as it isn't colored to start with. A solid colored shirt with poly content won't discharge, as colored poly doesn't discharge.

I've done this with NL6210 in Charcoal, which is a heathered color. Works with the Gildan 64000 heathers as well. Note, some colors (regardless of brand or style) tend not to discharge well. So test before ordering a bunch of stock.

EDIT: After zooming in, looks like rather than discharge it could be an opaque water based ink (like Permaset Supercover) for the white, red, and yellow. On a light-colored garment like that, it doesn't take much thickness of an opaque water base to cover well. But, yeah, discharge would have even less handfeel.
 

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I am constantly trying to improve my game. I saw a shirt the other day that had the most awesome print I have ever seen. I did some research and discovered it was printed by Industry Threadworks in San Diego.

It appears that it was printed with waterbase/discharge ink. It also seems that there is no underbase. I can do that on a cotton shirt... but this is obviously a 60/40 blend. I am thinking it is a Next Level 6210 or a Bella+Canvas 3001CVC.

Look how rich the colors are. And, I couldn't believe how soft it was. How did they do that? If anybody from that shop is out there and they want to share, it would be greatly appreciated!


As mentioned by @NoXid it looks like WB to me as well. You can achieve similar by ditching the discharge and using high opacity WB inks. I do it every day. No underbase, and the opacity is fantastic. Very little hand to the prints. If you want to see some recent samples, let me know. Some poly content items that are darker, it is best to add a low cure additive to the mix. For anyone wanting to try discharge, go for it I guess. But once I transitioned from plastisols to WB inks, I never looked back. And I considered discharge for quite awhile. YMMV.
 

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As mentioned by @NoXid it looks like WB to me as well.
You mean HSA (high solid acrylic), because discharge is water-based too.

HSA can do this particular job, but should not be compared to discharge... They are not similar in any way.
Discharge inks are actually regular translucent inks for white fabric, because the discharge additive makes the fabric white.
The ink is absorbed into the fabric and you cannot feel it after the first wash.

The big downsides for discharge are:
a) the smell when curing, and
b) the wash requirement.

BUT there are upsides too:
a) discharge inks can print higher detail through high mesh screens. Using mesh 305 and even higher is possible.
b) discharge inks do not clog the screens as easy as the HSA inks do.
c) discharge prints have better washability and will last longer, even the small details.
 

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The big downsides for discharge are:
a) the smell when curing, and
b) the wash requirement.
c) once you mix in the discharge agent, the ink has a limited shelf life.

Not necessarily a big issue for typical print shops, but a bit of added waste for those (insane) folks like me who do something close to POD with screen printing. The only use I make of it at the moment is something I can batch, so works out well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
As mentioned by @NoXid it looks like WB to me as well. You can achieve similar by ditching the discharge and using high opacity WB inks. I do it every day. No underbase, and the opacity is fantastic. Very little hand to the prints. If you want to see some recent samples, let me know. Some poly content items that are darker, it is best to add a low cure additive to the mix. For anyone wanting to try discharge, go for it I guess. But once I transitioned from plastisols to WB inks, I never looked back. And I considered discharge for quite awhile. YMMV.
I would love to see some samples! But, more importantly, what brand of inks would you suggest?
 

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You mean HSA (high solid acrylic), because discharge is water-based too.

HSA can do this particular job, but should not be compared to discharge... They are not similar in any way.
Discharge inks are actually regular translucent inks for white fabric, because the discharge additive makes the fabric white.
The ink is absorbed into the fabric and you cannot feel it after the first wash.

The big downsides for discharge are:
a) the smell when curing, and
b) the wash requirement.

BUT there are upsides too:
a) discharge inks can print higher detail through high mesh screens. Using mesh 305 and even higher is possible.
b) discharge inks do not clog the screens as easy as the HSA inks do.
c) discharge prints have better washability and will last longer, even the small details.
Yes, I was referring to HSA WB inks (on a darker garment of course). Or underbasing with standard WB inks as well.

You forgot the part about certain Discharge inks requiring better than adequate ventilation due to liabilities when breathing in certain vapors due, to the contents in some discharge inks (and activators) themselves.

HSA waterbase:

You can get finer than fine details using higher mesh counts. Halftones etc, there should be a few of my old prints floating around here somewhere. I am not on here often these days. Just because it may be "recommended" on a Permaset label does not mean it cannot be done. Permaset doesn't make the only HSA WB inks out there either.

Screen clogs while they certainly can be an issue, are mitigated once you work out your production flow. That usually, and essentially comes with experience. I have been printing WB and High Opacity WB for 10+ years now exclusively on a retail level where everything has to be on point. I have some of my most popular halftone design screens that are 8+ years old with zero clogs.

My WB prints that are 10 years old still look as new after 10 years of wear and washes. If you are driving the ink into the knit, and curing correctly that is literally a non issue.

Now, MY biggest issue is with some curly font designs clogging around the edges, over time with certain HSA colored inks. PS Red is the biggest defender. I have spoken on the phone with PS about this, they called me from AUS and they don't really have a solution for that. Some of my biggest sellers will start to clog around edges after about 6 months of abuse on press.

Regardless, wasn't meant to be a hot debate. Apparently that hasn't changed here. Fact of the matter remains that you can get the same result (or strikingly close to it) on a print like this using High Opacity WB inks. So yes, in fact they CAN be compared. Or, if you prefer, underbasing with a standard WB ink. I prefer not to underbase personally. YMMV and all of that jazz.

If I couldn't get strikingly close...then...I would use Discharge!
 
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