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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi everyone,

I know you're probably bored of the "how can I get a vintage effect" question, but I think this is slightly different (I may be wrong though)

Can you check out this t-shirt:






How is that done?

I don't think it's the usual Photoshop Brush is it? Is that a special method of printing? or is it all in the design preparation?

If I wanted that kind of an effect, would a screenprinting company be able to do it for me? Is this a standard request that most screen printers know how to do? :confused::confused:

if anyone can shed some light, I'd be most grateful.


Cheers. :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
It's really just a pattern?

WOW! It looks so real that I'm honestly blown away by the effects. :eek:

So this is achieved by adding the pattern to every single colour layer? i.e, cutting little specks and holes into the layer.

Or is a NEW layer created and then the speckles/dots are applied with a new layer of ink?

Either way, I guess it's done with a very fine mesh, right?


On a side note; has anyone here used this kind of effect for printing shirts? How did it go? Are screen printing companies OK with doing this, or is it too tricky for them and risky that it might go wrong and not look right. :confused:
 

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It's not done as part of the printing process, it's done as part of the design process. Design the way you normally would, then place a distress pattern (as a bitmap tif file) on top of the design. The distress pattern will "knock through" the design, creating that effect when the printer outputs film and creates screens. I don't believe screen printers have any issues with this at all.
 

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well i just learned something cool! so it will come out like that using plastisol or you would have to used water based inks?
Plastisol works fine and water based inks can be used. We've used both but majority of the vintage designs were done with plastisol. The inks were reduced slightly to give a softer hand feel and allow the garment color to effect the print.

the tshirt example you posted was done with plastisol inks
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Question to anyone who has the Mister Retro texture set:

Which of the 4 sets should I get for the above effect?
$349.95 for all 4 is a bit out of my price range. Will probably just buy one. :eek:
 

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Question to anyone who has the Mister Retro texture set:

Which of the 4 sets should I get for the above effect? $349.95 for all 4 is a bit out of my price range. Will probably just buy one. :eek:
That would be totally personal choice. I would just work my way through the examples and pick the set that has the most examples I like.
 

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Hi everyone,

I know you're probably bored of the "how can I get a vintage effect" question, but I think this is slightly different (I may be wrong though)

Can you check out this t-shirt:






How is that done?

I don't think it's the usual Photoshop Brush is it? Is that a special method of printing? or is it all in the design preparation?

If I wanted that kind of an effect, would a screenprinting company be able to do it for me? Is this a standard request that most screen printers know how to do? :confused::confused:

if anyone can shed some light, I'd be most grateful.


Cheers. :eek:
You can actually get that type of effect by adding what's known as "noise" in gimp & I imagine is available in any decent graphics program. The effect will look like fuzzy TV reception. It'll look something like this but with your color adjustments or 1 color.
 

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It's really just a pattern?

WOW! It looks so real that I'm honestly blown away by the effects. :eek:

So this is achieved by adding the pattern to every single colour layer? i.e, cutting little specks and holes into the layer.

Or is a NEW layer created and then the speckles/dots are applied with a new layer of ink?

Either way, I guess it's done with a very fine mesh, right?


On a side note; has anyone here used this kind of effect for printing shirts? How did it go? Are screen printing companies OK with doing this, or is it too tricky for them and risky that it might go wrong and not look right. :confused:
i've handled many separations over the years for these 'weathered' looks and they are all part of the image, 90% of the time it's a bitmap image over the design.

for this particular look (the one used in the 3monkeys design), it's a vintage effect to emulate an old shirt that has been washed and worn hundreds of times, fading out the print in patches.
We created a template of a jersey knit at actual size, we'd overlay that in photoshop and use the airbrush to spray out sections and manually weather the graphic for specific look for each design (you want control over what areas/parts are blown out from the design).

I haven't personally used any of the clipart or mister retro plugins, but the one you'd want for that specific effect will show the vertical grain line of the fabric weave.
 

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If you have Photoshop, a good way to save money on textures, overlays and brushes for stuff like this is to build a library of your own. Not only are there a million free texture images available all over the internet which you can play around with in PS, convert to a black and white bitmap and save for future use as an overlay, but you can make your own distress textures by scanning in crumpled paper or leaves or literally anything you can get into your scanner (or digital camera). Just make sure to pay attention to dimensions and resolution.
 
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