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Discussion Starter #1
:p:pI just had a great idea if you can not buy a Convoyer dryer or a Flash dryer. Way not use a Heat transfer press? For one thing it has a tempature gage you can dial up to 350 degrees or more, The only thing it can not be lowered too much to touch the shirt that was screen print.

I had the idea of using my Press but how would I fix the problem of the heating element? Easy, C-clamps is the perfect way to help the lower the press without touchiing the shirt.

Clamp the c-clamp at the front of the press and adjust the height so it is at least 3-4 inches above the shirt. the clamp stays snuggly in place without making a dent in the lid of the press. You can adjust the height and tension-(The heat press- put lite prssure). I first used a 4 inch c-clamp but then bought a 6 inch wide range one, Both clamps were under $8.00.

Has anyone tried this and if you have- how did it work for you? I can not get a real Flash for I have a 3 year old who is very busy and I live in a Single apartment-so space is limted. I sought a lot of threads about other things to help cure shirts if you could not use a Flash dryer but not one using a heat press. My heat press is a Clam shell.

So I would like some comments please, it hard for me to get any feed back in this forum and when I do I really appreciate the advice and positive critism (sp).:D
 

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I have a flash that I quick cure with and final cure with my heat press.

Instead of your set-up, why don't you use a heat gun to gel the ink and final cure with the press?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I do have an heat gun. I should have stated that but no one would want to final cure shirts with a heat gun. that seems very slow and combursome.
Thank you for your response.
 

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haha No, I wouldn't final cure with a heat gun either. The flash dryer is too slow of a process for me too, which is why I do a 6-10 sec. gel cure with the flash dryer and final cure with my heat press.

Besides, I like the feel of the ink after it has been pressed. I'm sure I'll change my set-up when I can afford a conveyor dryer, though.
 

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Amy
when you final cure on the heat press what temp, time & pressure do you use? and do you use a teflon sheet or something to protect the upper platen from the ink? I think I need to adopt this method as I find flash curing a bit slow as well. Thanks for your assistance.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I would not close the lid to the heat press until the final cure nor would I use a teflon sheet. I heat my heat press a little hotter than 325 drgrees for my heat press itemperature drops some not a lot vut some. Use the C-clamp to hold the lid from springing open.
 

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I final cure with a heat press. My heat press adjusts so that I have a 1/4" or so space from the heat platen and the shirt. I crank the temperature to 400 and cure for 1 1/2 to 2 minutes. Works great for me and shirts have stood up to multiple washings. I still want a conveyor dryer but the one I want costs 3 grand new so that will have to wait awhile.
 

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You can close the heat press onto the shirt to cure it, but you must have a barrier between the shirt and the heating element. Teflon sheet or transfer paper works, but your shirt will feel like a cold peel transfer once it is done.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
"I did not think you could touh the freshly printed hirt witout the ink sticking to the element or the Tef;on sheet".

Thanks again for the advice.
 

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I set my press on around 350 degrees and press for 5-10 seconds. Any longer and you'll burn your ink. You can test the ink temp with a temp gun when you open the press to figure out the duration you should use for your own press.

I do use a teflon sheet and I love the soft hand it leaves.
 

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You can close the heat press onto the shirt to cure it, but you must have a barrier between the shirt and the heating element. Teflon sheet or transfer paper works, but your shirt will feel like a cold peel transfer once it is done.
Can you use your paper transfer sheet more then once?
 

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You probably can get a couple or three cures with a sheet, but what is the cost of a sheet of paper versus a ruined t-shirt? If you feel the need, experiment. Come up with a number that works to re-use the paper, then reduce that number by one time. Err on the safe side.
 

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The first printing job was white ink on a red Hanes shirt - cured with a transfer press protected by a Teflon sheet.

In 1980, I scheduled production for a large flag company that also printed shirts. I'd told a girl I could print her some shirts, but didn't actually know how to turn on the conveyor oven. I'd read about how to use a heat transfer press to cure plastisol in the 1978 first edition of Scott & Pat Fresener's book "How to Print T-Shirts for Fun and Profit". I did know how to turn on the transfer press.

I'd never printed before, but that night, I ran up and down 3 flights of stairs, 18 times between the printing press and the heat press to impress a girl.

In the book, they advocate a thin piece of wood to block the heat press platen from touching the shirt.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Hello to everyone.
I am kind of all-struck. I started the posted and gave a suggestion on how to use the heat press to help cure t-shirts- but I am not getting the thanks for posting a good idea rather it is old or new news I believe I have answered and explained just about everthing about a heat press if you could not afford a conveyor dryer of a Flash unit. Why does it seems my blog is over looked and everyone else who did not start the thread is getting credit. Any way for those who has answered my question or suggestion I thank you very much, and everyone else have a beutiful day.
 

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Sorry, Angel, I guess I didn't understand the C-clamp application. My press isn't an auto open. Your idea seems to have merit to allow it to hover above the garment. The only time I have used my heat press for a final cure was on plastisol transfers I made. Never thought about this until you brought it up that I could use the press for a final cure on my regular prints instead of the flash dryer. You did start a good discussion and I thank you for that.
 

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Basically you are wrong in the assumption that you cant cure plastisol ink or water based ink without closing the press. I have done both and it works just fine. So the question is are you breaking new ground....not hardly. It really all depends on the ink layer and what screen you use to lay it down.
 

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I started the posted and gave a suggestion on how to use the heat press to help cure t-shirts- but I am not getting the thanks for posting a good idea rather it is old or new news I believe I have answered and explained just about everthing about a heat press if you could not afford a conveyor dryer of a Flash unit. Why does it seems my blog is over looked and everyone else who did not start the thread is getting credit.
You post just for kudos, or to teach and learn?

The forum has dozens of posts on using a heat press to cure plastisol ink. You'll have to excuse us if we don't get as excited as you after seeing the 50th post on the subject.
 

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The first printing job was white ink on a red Hanes shirt - cured with a transfer press protected by a Teflon sheet.

In 1980, I scheduled production for a large flag company that also printed shirts. I'd told a girl I could print her some shirts, but didn't actually know how to turn on the conveyor oven. I'd read about how to use a heat transfer press to cure plastisol in the 1978 first edition of Scott & Pat Fresener's book "How to Print T-Shirts for Fun and Profit". I did know how to turn on the transfer press.

I'd never printed before, but that night, I ran up and down 3 flights of stairs, 18 times between the printing press and the heat press to impress a girl.

In the book, they advocate a thin piece of wood to block the heat press platen from touching the shirt.
…So… what happened with the girl??:)
 
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