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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am trying to use Gimp for designs, right of the bat I am struggling to understand what should be some basics stuff.

I am wanting to create 2 separate templates...... 1- for the platen to align the artwork film on press and 2- the transparency film registration marks.

I simply can not create the + mark, I have tried to create a vertical line then would attempt to copy and paste that exact line horizontally however I cant figure out how to copy and paste lines.

I also would need to understand how to group the lines so I can align correctly and make a bottom portion of the registration marks.

Im sure this seems so simply and I promise Im not that computer illiterate just seems Gimp is not that intuitive for me.

Please help I'm very frustrated.
 

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add a new layer with your marks only, then you can use one of the selector tools to choose one or all of your marks (hold shift while selecting more than one to group selection)

personally, i would make your template and lines in a vector program, then import transparent png into gimp (it is much easier to create/manipulate in vector, rather than raster)

or, even better:
you are allowed to copy and paste directly from inkscape
if you copy & paste from inkscape it will come in as vector on its own fancy layer that you have to find (see below)
but it will always be there for manipulation (you can even add multiple reg mark paths on the same template and simply toggle visibility)

* inkscape copy & paste *
  • make your template size the same as in gimp and add your reg marks (size and aligned properly)
  • copy and paste onto your registration marks layer
  • you will not be able to see anything until you click the little 'paths' tab in the upper right and then click the little eye to make it visible
  • hit the little red box highlighted in image 2 (or selection menu tab and 'from path')
  • now your marks are visible, but transparent and aligned left
  • click the align & distribute tool (2nd tool on the upper tools), and click inside one of your marks, then click the align up/down & left/right
  • once you are happy, click the fill bucket and fill (the little red lines still visible are your registration marks paths, they will not print, but if they bother you just turn the little eye off in the paths tab, leave them there though in case you want to adjust later)
Light Screenshot Font Line Software
Screenshot Line Font Rectangle Software
Colorfulness Photograph Light Screenshot Font
Colorfulness Light Screenshot Font Line
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
i would make your template and lines in a vector program, then import transparent png into gimp
(it is much easier to create/manipulate in vector, rather than raster)

or simply add a new layer with your marks only, then you can use one of the selector tools to choose one or all of your marks (hold shift while selecting more than one to group selection)
Thanks for the reply, vector program would that be something like Inkscape?

If using Gimp you mentioned create layers so a simple cross hair " + " would have 2 layers...am i understanding that?

Thanks again.
 

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Thanks for the reply, vector program would that be something like Inkscape?

If using Gimp you mentioned create layers so a simple cross hair " + " would have 2 layers...am i understanding that?

Thanks again.
Yes, Inkscape is vector. With raster/pixel/paint programs, what you draw becomes pixels at some point, and ceases to be objects you can manipulate other than via pixel editing. With a vector program, everything remains an object of its own, an object that can be individually selected, moved, deleted, resized, copied etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Yes, Inkscape is vector. With raster/pixel/paint programs, what you draw becomes pixels at some point, and ceases to be objects you can manipulate other than via pixel editing. With a vector program, everything remains an object of its own, an object that can be individually selected, moved, deleted, resized, copied etc.
So using inkscape in general would be better that gimp right(you dont want pixelization of an image when screen printing, correct?)

Also will the registration marks print on the film(obviously I need the reg marks to align the screen) is it possible to create a template in inkscape with just the registration marks, then when I want to add a design I create the design on the template w/ reg marks and keep from having to create RM every design?
 

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So using inkscape in general would be better that gimp right(you dont want pixelization of an image when screen printing, correct?)

Also will the registration marks print on the film(obviously I need the reg marks to align the screen) is it possible to create a template in inkscape with just the registration marks, then when I want to add a design I create the design on the template w/ reg marks and keep from having to create RM every design?
Call it a "template" if you want. I'd just create an Inkscape file with the reg marks you want and name it something like ... Template ;) When you want to create a design, just copy the file and name the copy something like GreatDesign-1.

Pixelization isn't an issue when you are creating the art yourself (as opposed to resizing an existing .png/.jpg) because you create it at the correct size and resolution. If you want your final print to be 10 inches wide, then make the art 3000 pixels wide (10" x 300 dpi).
 

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I simply can not create the + mark, I have tried to create a vertical line then would attempt to copy and paste that exact line horizontally however I cant figure out how to copy and paste lines.
You could simply use the text tool and type "+".
You can also use this... (copy and paste).
Font Symbol Emblem Symmetry Circle

There is no need for horizontal or vertical alignment... but if want them aligned, you can use
a) View--> View Grid, OR
b) Image--> Guides -->New Guide.

I also would need to understand how to group the lines so I can align correctly and make a bottom portion of the registration marks.
Any time you want to group whatever, you can create a "layer group".
Computer Rectangle Font Screenshot Software


I promise Im not that computer illiterate just seems Gimp is not that intuitive for me.
Computer literacy is a loose term.
Knowing how to use windows and MS word does NOT mean you can use graphics software.
You just have to practice and use your head.
It takes time to learn. I've been using GIMP for over 10 years and I still learn new tricks all the time.

If using Gimp you mentioned create layers so a simple cross hair " + " would have 2 layers...am i understanding that?
What I use is a transparent layer of the correct film size (A4, A3 etc),
Two cross-hair registration marks (top and bottom).
I simply make a copy to use every time I start a new design.

vector program would that be something like Inkscape?
Some things are way easier to do in Inkscape and some are easier in GIMP.
You may also want to try Krita. It's really good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
You could simply use the text tool and type "+".
You can also use this... (copy and paste).
View attachment 276010
There is no need for horizontal or vertical alignment... but if want them aligned, you can use
a) View--> View Grid, OR
b) Image--> Guides -->New Guide.


Any time you want to group whatever, you can create a "layer group".
View attachment 276012


Computer literacy is a loose term.
Knowing how to use windows and MS word does NOT mean you can use graphics software.
You just have to practice and use your head.
It takes time to learn. I've been using GIMP for over 10 years and I still learn new tricks all the time.


What I use is a transparent layer of the correct film size (A4, A3 etc),
Two cross-hair registration marks (top and bottom).
I simply make a copy to use every time I start a new design.


Some things are way easier to do in Inkscape and some are easier in GIMP.
You may also want to try Krita. It's really good.
I tried the copy and past with your registration marks(perhaps I did it wrong)
I first created a new image scaled to the size of the transparency film- 8.5x11
2 then I used guides to line up the marks 3 across the L/C/R and 2 on the bottom L/R
3 then I save this as a PNG file.
4 created another new art board this time the size of the palet )12x12
5 I then brought in the saved image of the registration template
6 next I added an image to the art board- however here is where I run into issues:
1st- the registration mars are covered by the design image
2nd- I am unable to scale the design-when I use scaling tool it moves the entire image (design & reg marks) so I am unable to scale down the design an expose the registration marks.

Can someone explain where I am going wrong here?
 

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2 then I used guides to line up the marks 3 across the L/C/R and 2 on the bottom L/R
I told you this is not needed. Where the registration marks are is irrelevant.
All you have to do is leave them alone and print all the color layers with the same registration marks.

Example: A4 template with registration marks
Rectangle Screenshot Font Slope Software

They are not aligned to anything and can be moved in another location if required.

Here is an example of a two color design (one color per layer).
Eyelash Jaw Font Screenshot Lipstick

This way each color can be printed separately. No need to touch the registration marks.

Here is how you print the films:
Font Screenshot Line Art Rectangle
Black layer (ready to print)
Rectangle Font Screenshot Slope Software
Red layer (ready to print)

Here is the GIMP file. Feel free to use it...
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I told you this is not needed. Where the registration marks are is irrelevant.
All you have to do is leave them alone and print all the color layers with the same registration marks.

Example: A4 template with registration marks
View attachment 276017
They are not aligned to anything and can be moved in another location if required.

Here is an example of a two color design (one color per layer).
View attachment 276018
This way each color can be printed separately. No need to touch the registration marks.

Here is how you print the films:
View attachment 276015 Black layer (ready to print)
View attachment 276016 Red layer (ready to print)

Here is the GIMP file. Feel free to use it...
I truly appreciate your input and help, when I create the registration marks (2) when I bring in my design it still is covering the marks..... I have tried to scale the design but it only changes the size of the template ( the space to create with)....Im sure its not this difficult ,,,,im just struggling to grasp the concept of this procedure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
You need to scale the the design layer... not the image.
Layer-->Scale Layer
Alternatively you can use the scale tool (Shift+S).
I have tried all I understand and this just is not working

I create a new art board (12"x12"- palate size)
then I add my design - image- click on that in the box on the right renamed it design
next I press shift+S and the image is hilited with the marching ants BUT its very small, I try to scale the image and it simply does not align correctly and the scaling box goes off screen.

I must be doing this incorrectly I just dont get it.......Im not sure if photoshop is any easier, thinking of trying the 7 day free trial.

Otherwise Im going to need to pay a designer which I really dont want to do

I feel Im smart and capable learner---just not picking this up and its aggravating now beyond frustrated.
 

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Im not sure if photoshop is any easier, thinking of trying the 7 day free trial.
It isn't, but give it a try if you want.
The same principles apply but things are in different places or have a different name.

I press shift+S and the image is hilited with the marching ants
Marching ants? You are doing something wrong obviously.
This is how the scale tool looks
Eye Eyelash Human body Jaw Organism

You can simply type in the values in the box (1), or you can drag the handles (2).
If you use the handles, use Ctrl+click to maintain the aspect ratio

Otherwise Im going to need to pay a designer which I really dont want to do
You may have to if you give up so easy.
You will not learn GIMP or Photoshop in a day, especially not with zero graphics software background.
Anyway... maybe this video will help...
 

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I have tried all I understand and this just is not working

I create a new art board (12"x12"- palate size)
then I add my design - image- click on that in the box on the right renamed it design
next I press shift+S and the image is hilited with the marching ants BUT its very small, I try to scale the image and it simply does not align correctly and the scaling box goes off screen.

I must be doing this incorrectly I just dont get it.......Im not sure if photoshop is any easier, thinking of trying the 7 day free trial.

Otherwise Im going to need to pay a designer which I really dont want to do

I feel Im smart and capable learner---just not picking this up and its aggravating now beyond frustrated.
For $51 PSP2022 is a steal

 

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To be honest, what kind of skills do you really need to knock out a few t-shirt designs?

It's certainly not rocket science and a handful of the most basic skills will get you a long way. Forget about A.I. and neural filter effects, they're just not needed.

Try the free online Photopea if you want a good knock-down version of Photoshop.
 

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I'm going to apologise right now for this reply being the length of a small novel !

Something people getting into designing 'their own' prints for shirts, mugs or whatever forget, is that graphic design is not something that comes naturally.
Think back to learning to drive a manual shift car. Learning how to juggle the accelerator and clutch to get the thing moving at all takes time and patience. Then you have to learn to stop!
Combining these skills in a safe way until you can drive at a normal 'around town speed' can have your driving instructor / parent tearing their hair.

Then they chuck things at you like starting on a hill. Keeping an eye out at all times for other traffic. Guessing what the idiot approaching the intersection at the same time as you is going to do - and realising he is probably wondering the same thing.
And one day they say righ, now I want you to reverse this car into a parking space only a couple of feet bigger than your car - and NOT HIT anything !

That's before you actually start 'learning anything.

Well, that's what you are doing when you decide to design your own artwork.
But think about it for a moment. What has learning to drive got to do with designing artwork?
Well, almost everyone you know drives a car.

You have to 'learn stuff' no matter what you want to do. If you are a mechanic, you do an apprenticeship and you probably have to 'unlearn' the ham fisted way you use a spanner or a screwdriver. Being a car driver does not automatically mean you can fly an aeroplane.
Being able to use a computer does not mean you automatically know how to design and print a T-Shirt.

With computers, to do your own graphic work you have to 'learn' tools like:
Photoshop or GIMP
Inkscape (or Corel or whatever vector graphics program you want to use)
ImageMagick (if you are using Linux or Mac - I don;t know whether Fred did a Windows version)

You should also learn to Understand your Printer and something called 'Colour Profiles', but that can come later when you wonder why you are not getting lovely vibrant colours.

Gimp is no harder or easier than Photoshop - it just happens to do more or less everything that Photoshop will do without costing money.
Likewise Inkscape and Corel.

As people have already pointed out here, Inkscape allows you to do things you can't really do well in Photoshop or Gimp (because Gimp and Photoshop are 'Raster Graphics programs' and are meant to work with images like Photographs. Photographs are made up of lots of 'Dots' called 'Pixels' that are sort of set in their size. You can make them bigger, but you can't add more of them to make the image stay sharp. I can't really explain this here so you have to just take my word for it (or try making a photo bigger in Gimp - you will see what I mean).
When you change the size of a Photograph in Gimp or Photoshop, if you make it ten times as big you also make every little dot ten times as big.
Suddenly the little pixels (dots, remember) that were each maybe smaller than a pinhead, are bigger than a grain of rice.
And your lovely image of a cat is all blurry and its whiskers are great jaggy lines.

Inkscape on the other hand, is a Vector Graphics program and works with 'Lines' and objects that are made using numbers to control them. It can fill those lines and objects with a colour, or colours, and it can even fill those lines with an image.
However enlarging an image that is in Gimp probably makes it blurry, because the image was still made from dots. Enlarging an object or line in Inkscape keeps it nice and sharp and clean.
For example:
In Gimp a line made four times bigger gets four times longer and four times fatter (and all jaggy). You don't have any choice - it gets fatter.
In Inkscape, a line made four times bigger just gets four times longer - but it can stay thin (unless you actually tell it you want it fatter).

Where Inkscape and other Vector drawing programs shine in T-shirt printing is for doing LOGOS.
Because a logo doesn't usually have a photo image in it, you can make the whole thing out of lines (even lines that make up a circle) and because the solid colours are made using a mathematical formula that allows more tiny dots to be added when you do something like scale a Font (Logo text for example) or a design object (like a circle with a colour in it) as the object gets bigger, instead of the individual dots that make the image getting bigger and blurry - Inkscape just creates more tiny dots as the line or object grows. And the image stays sharp. And prints sharp.

So all that waffling on was to say:
Gimp or Photoshop for Pictures
Inkscape or Corel Draw for Line Art, Shapes and Logos.

And the whole point of the rant is to suggest that while T-Shirt Forums members are always happy to help someone new with suggestions and advice, it is very hard for them sometimes to try to tell someone to make their registration marks in Inkscape, then import the Inkscape file as a transparent layer into Gimp - if the person asking the question has not a clue what they are talking about.

It might help your business a hell of a lot if you went back to college and did a couple of courses on learning Inkscape and Learning Gimp.
The best, and most affordable colleges I can think of are 'Google' (or 'Duckduckgo') and YouTube.
Just ask YouTube about something like:
Gimp Tutorial Layers
Gimp tutorial scaling images
Inkscape tutorial make registration marks for gimp

And variations on those workds. It is also worth searching YouTube for:
Introduction to Gimp
Introduction to Inkscape
Gimp beginners
Inkscape beginners

And so on. You can do the same thing in Google or Duckduckgo.
Remember also that you can pause and rewind YouTube videos, and bookmark them so you can replay the ones you find most useful.

Combine that with asking questions here and you will soon get the whole graphics thing under control.

Please don;t take my suggestions the wrong way. I'm not saying there's anything at all wrong with asking how to do stuff here. Just suggesting that learning a few basic skill will help you understand better, the instructions you are given when you do ask.
i.e. if you ask something and you cannot understand what the person replying is telling you to do - Mr Google, or Mr YouTube are your friends . .
 

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having taught myself photoshop elements and dabbled with manga studio, I find gimp impossibly clunky to work with. button clicks never happen when you jump through a dozen pretty please hoops to do things like simply grab a layer and reposition it. i think its name is a reference to how hobbled using it is. it has some nice power features, but the way it handles layers alone is reason for me to hate it. I just bought (the wrong model) a used 10 inch galaxy A8 for $100 only to see samsung offering new S8s (better active screens and specs than A line) for the same price, but the first line I drew on it using sketchbook brought a smile to my face. it seems like an intuitive program, but last night i dabbled with krita which I like too. both were free and just test drives. gimp is the last program i'd use if given a choice. i think autodesk is available for most operating systems free. i'd test drive that before ever working with gimp like i must on this library computer
 

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...I find gimp impossibly clunky to work with. button clicks never happen when you jump through a dozen pretty please hoops to do things like simply grab a layer and reposition it.
repositioning layers is simply grab & move

when you choose the move tool you have the option of moving the active layer, or the layer where you click the cursor
you don't even have to change the radio button to toggle uses, simply hold shift to use the other option

Font Screenshot Multimedia Software Number
 

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I find gimp impossibly clunky to work with
last night i dabbled with krita which I like too. both were free and just test drives. gimp is the last program i'd use if given a choice. i think autodesk is available for most operating systems free.
GIMP is more for photo manipulation, and Krira is more for drawing.
Both are good tools, but you will not become an expert in 2 days, or even a month.
I've been using them for years, and I still learn new things.
You should also learn Inkscape.
 
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