T-Shirt Forums banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was doing some shirts over the weekend and when i pressed them have a box around the image like the size of paper.. i have the foam pillow under the image with edges hanging off and lite pressure set when i press if i went with less pressure the ink on the bottom would look like it worked.. any help i would appreciate.. thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
I was doing some shirts over the weekend and when i pressed them have a box around the image like the size of paper.. i have the foam pillow under the image with edges hanging off and lite pressure set when i press if i went with less pressure the ink on the bottom would look like it worked.. any help i would appreciate.. thanks
I have had the same problem. It is the dye reacting with the heat and is changing the shirt color. The only way I have figured out how to solve this is to press the entire shirt first in sections for about 7 seconds each until the whole front of the shirt is pressed. I have a 16x20 press and place the shirt where the collar is hanging off one of the long sides and can usually press the front of the shirt in 4 passes. Then continue to do what you did above. If there is still a color difference after I cover the shirt with a teflon sheet and press until it goes away. Good luck and let me know if it works for you. I have had to do this with Jerzee 21m, and Sport Tec 350's. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
137 Posts
As Grovian pointed out, tearing the paper around the image instead of cutting it out helps a lot. Leave plenty of room around the image (at least an inch and a half). DO NOT fold the paper and tear along the fold -- the fold WILL show up later. I tear along the edge of a table -- and tear UP and away from the table, with one hand holding the paper firmly in place (move it as you go on larger images).

When pressing, I place clean butcher paper on the bottom of the press, then the garment (if t-shirts, just make sure the collar overhangs the press), then your lightly sprayed image paper, then another piece of clean butcher paper. After the pressing is done, lift off the top butcher paper, then hold the image paper down in the center with your fingernails (or put on an OveGlove) and gently pull back the top edge and then the bottom edge to be sure your image is correct. If it's not, put down another sheet of butcher paper and press for another 25 - 30 seconds. Once you have the timing down, you don't have to do this with every shirt.

When you're happy with the quality of the image, remove the image paper and lay down yet another piece of clean butcher paper over the entire garment. Press for 12 - 15 seconds. This will make the tear lines from your image paper all but invisible. Remove the paper, pull off the t-shirt, and snap it in the air a couple of times.

I stopped using teflon when sublimating shirts. If I need to, I use the Vapor Foam kit (mostly for polos, which I rarely do, and for hoodies). You can either wrap butcher paper around the foam and secure it with heat tape, or just lay down the foam on the press and put your paper over it. The reason I don't like to use teflon sheets or pillows is that I find it leaves a shiny area on the fabric which never goes away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
As Grovian pointed out, tearing the paper around the image instead of cutting it out helps a lot. Leave plenty of room around the image (at least an inch and a half). DO NOT fold the paper and tear along the fold -- the fold WILL show up later. I tear along the edge of a table -- and tear UP and away from the table, with one hand holding the paper firmly in place (move it as you go on larger images).

When pressing, I place clean butcher paper on the bottom of the press, then the garment (if t-shirts, just make sure the collar overhangs the press), then your lightly sprayed image paper, then another piece of clean butcher paper. After the pressing is done, lift off the top butcher paper, then hold the image paper down in the center with your fingernails (or put on an OveGlove) and gently pull back the top edge and then the bottom edge to be sure your image is correct. If it's not, put down another sheet of butcher paper and press for another 25 - 30 seconds. Once you have the timing down, you don't have to do this with every shirt.

When you're happy with the quality of the image, remove the image paper and lay down yet another piece of clean butcher paper over the entire garment. Press for 12 - 15 seconds. This will make the tear lines from your image paper all but invisible. Remove the paper, pull off the t-shirt, and snap it in the air a couple of times.

I stopped using teflon when sublimating shirts. If I need to, I use the Vapor Foam kit (mostly for polos, which I rarely do, and for hoodies). You can either wrap butcher paper around the foam and secure it with heat tape, or just lay down the foam on the press and put your paper over it. The reason I don't like to use teflon sheets or pillows is that I find it leaves a shiny area on the fabric which never goes away.
Your approach works well for white garments but the OP shirt was a dark blue and there is dye migration from the heat. The only way I have seen to get that out is to press the entire shirt to even out the color and then sublimate. The only way to avoid this is to press under 300 degrees but you can't sublimate at that temp. This is really good discussion. I struggled with this for a while before I found something that works for me. Would love to hear from others on sublimating on shirts other than white.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top