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Discussion Starter #1
I have an EPSON C230 with sublimation ink. I tried this sublimation paper and heat pressed my design on a white t-shirt (a 60-40 CVC). The color of the print in the shirt did not match with the original color I wanted. The Blue turned almost Gray. Also, I tried it to a light colored shirt (Light Blue) and again the colors are not the same with the original print.

My heat press setting is 170C for 100 sec. Thats what the guy who sold me the paper said.

What am I doing wrong? is it in the paper, my setting, or is it really like that? :confused:

Thanks!
 

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From your description I can see 2 potential problems:

1. if you are pressing onto poly/cotton t-shirts, dye sublimation ink will only bond to polyester fibres in the blend and will not adhere to cotton. The print will look faded: the higher percentage of cotton you have in you t-shirt - the more "washed out" look you'll get.

2. recommended pressing settings for dye-sublimation are 200C for 45-60 sec on light pressure.

Try pressing 100% poly at this temperature - if your colours are still wrong, check if you have blocked nozzles.

When you are pressing onto a coloured t-shirt, the colours of the design will not be true: dye-sublimation inks are not opaque, so the background colour of your t-shirt will come through the print and the colours of your design will adopt a "hue" of the t-shirt colour.
For example, if you are pressing onto a light blue t-shirt and your design has yellow elements, they will look slighltly green-ish. Pink colour will turn slightly purple and blue colour will become darker.
 

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I agree with all of Tania's explanation and recommendation.

Just want to add this:
The color of the print in the shirt did not match with the original color I wanted.
The "original color" you wanted is the one shown on your monitor?
Is the file "created from scratch", or, was it provided by a customer, or maybe from a stock artwork site?
This might be a "RIP Problem", or, it's just the "way the original file was created".
This is a common problem in digital printing and sublimation printing has too many parameters that such problems is sure to happen again.
Our usual problem is the "blue turning purple (violet)" phenomenon. This is common for us especially if it's a customer supplied artwork.
 

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What type of inks are you using? I know sawgrass owns most of the desktop sublimation rights, but I also know you can get cheap inks in asia.

Also Are you using a power driver or an icc profile, this will help to match the original color. ANd is the ICC profile the correct one for your brand of inks and for the printer?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the reply D.Evo.

I will try your suggestions as soon as I can. I very much appreciate it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The file I'm using is an original artwork of mine. Im trying to make my own line of Shirts for Kids using original artworks done in Photoshop. I'm on my Trial/Experimental stage and I'm really new to this.

The Ink I'm using was provided by a local Printer Repair shop and Ink provider, so I'm guessing it's the cheap kind. Im not entirely sure if im using a power driver or icc profile. As you can tell, im really really new to this.

Thanks for all the information!
 

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You can try and ask if the ink provider has a icc profile for you to use. Once you get the profile from them, you can activate it with your graphics software. Recommended software is Corel Draw or Photoshop. Check out sawgrass' site to give you an idea of color management.

Also sawgrass has another brand artanium and has lots of information on icc profiles and how to use them. I don't believe their profiles would be any good for you to use with your inks though.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Thanks for the tips guys! very much appreciated.
I did the swatches, and i'll be using it as a guide whenever i'll design.

I also tried the suggested pressing setting from D.Evo. and i got better results than last time.
I will be experimenting and studying some more so i can make great prints!

Great tips and thanks for the help! :D
 

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I'm doing a sublimation printing in 100% cotton shirt, in our first days of printing color's are working so well but as we go on green color turns to be dark brown and yellow. What is the possible problem with that?
 

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Dye Sublimation, is the method of applying an image to specially coated ceramics, metals and polyester cloth, using three main ingredients: sublimation ink, heat and pressure.

Sublimation ink is unique in its ability to convert from a solid to a gas without going through a liquid form. The conversion is initiated by heat and controlled with pressure and time. Hard items such as ceramic, fiber board, metals, etc. requires a special coating to accept the sublimation inks.
 
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