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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone!

Never even knew a website like this existed... So pleased I found it.

So I'm new to printing and setting up my own little business. I am printing on Jet Pro SS using my inkjet printer. I'm also using an iron as I didn't want to get a heatpress just yet at this early stage.

I've done my first two, 100% cotton tops, ironed on a hard floor with a pillow case underneath and pressed as hard as possible for 30 secs the first time and 40 the second time as the print was small and the iron itself covered it.

It's transferred and peeled okay but the image isn't as bright and as clear as id have hoped. It's quite granular, I was hoping for the bold circle to be completely full as it looks on the screen and transfer paper.

I wanted to post a picture of the transfer I did but I don't think I can??

Any advice for a complete newbie?

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
My advice is to read and follow the paper's instructions. JPSS is to be applied with a commercial heat press.
Hi, I did follow the instructions. On their websites it provides instructions for both heat press and hand iron and says you can use both. I then did what it said regarding the hard surface, pillowcase, timings etc.
 

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Greetings fellow printers,
Not sure if I'm in the right area. I would like to know how to print transfers on both sides of a T. I have a small one, 3x4 to go on the front pocket area, and a 12x13 for the back. I figure it would be best to do the front first, then the back. Should I use the silicon sheet that came with my press inside of the shirt when I do the back?
 

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Here's the photo!
The shirt has coarse knit. You have to stretch the shirt really hard. In addition get something like cardboard that you can insert inside the shirt that is wider than the shirt to keep the stretched while you press the transfer. Use very hard pressure so that the ink/polymer will penetrate the material between the knit ribs. Use tight knit shirt like 50/50. It is better to use commercial heat press because you can press really hard if you have to. The temperature is stable at set point and you know the actual temperature as suppose to guessing when using an iron. Ther heat and pressure is applied evenly across the surface of the heat transfer.
 

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Luis,
The shirt is a Gildan 100% heavy cotton. Do I use the silicon sheet inside the shirt or not? I want to know how to keep from messing up the smaller transfer. Do I wait a day or so before I print the larger transfer/
 

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Luis,
The shirt is a Gildan 100% heavy cotton. Do I use the silicon sheet inside the shirt or not? I want to know how to keep from messing up the smaller transfer. Do I wait a day or so before I print the larger transfer/
I have pressing since 1990. I have yet to put anything inside the shirt even pressing on both sides of the shirt. It is necessary if the ink is sublimation or if the shirt is very thin 100% cotton or cotton blend. But I have never used anything inside the shirt for 100% cotton or cotton blend. Sublimation ink will potentially sublimate or bleed through the shirt.

You can press both sides one after the other. You don't have to wait. Make sure you have teflon sheet cover in the lower platen to prevent it from getting stained. I press the small transfer on the front first. I do not peel the carrier. Flip the shirt over. Press the back side. Peel the carrier. Flip the shirt. Press it for 6 to 10 seconds to soften the polymer. Peel the carrier. Stretch the shirt while it is still warm. To minimize cracking cover the shirt with parchment paper. Press for 6 to 10 seconds. Flip the shirt. Cover the shirt with parchment paper. Press it for 6 to 10 seconds. You may wonder why I press the shirt many times? I do it because a) It will drive the ink/polymer dipper into the fabric, b) To minimize cracking and c) To make the transferred image durable.
 

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Luis,
All of this is good and well, but all I am doing is pressing plastisol transfers on this shirt. Are you familiar with these types of transfers? I just want to know what the effect will be on the smaller transfer once I flip the shirt and print the larger transfer. How can I protect the small transfer from being effected by the heat when I flip it and press it again? I'm using a 15x15 heat press.
 

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Luis,
All of this is good and well, but all I am doing is pressing plastisol transfers on this shirt. Are you familiar with these types of transfers? I just want to know what the effect will be on the smaller transfer once I flip the shirt and print the larger transfer. How can I protect the small transfer from being effected by the heat when I flip it and press it again? I'm using a 15x15 heat press.
When using plastisol transfers, you will need to protect the transfers from getting pressed/heated a second time, if you don't do so the first design will overcure.and peel.

If you are doing a big design on the back and a small one in the front, I would say do the bigger one first. That way you can then flip the shirt over and use a mousepad or Teflon pillow on the smaller one, which will stop the heat from reaching the other side.

The mousepad must be a hard type one, not a soft one because that will make the ink smear. You can also search for Teflon pillows and see how those are used.

These design were made like that. Back first, then shirt flipped, pad inserted and front pressed.





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