T-Shirt Forums banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
1,335 Posts
Inkjet transfers are a second best to plastisol. Plastisol transfers must be ordered in quantity. With inkjet, you can do one cost effectively. I use transfer paper for light color garments. I do occasionally use the dark, but don't really like the result. God Bless.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Inkjet transfers are a second best to plastisol. Plastisol transfers must be ordered in quantity. With inkjet, you can do one cost effectively. I use transfer paper for light color garments. I do occasionally use the dark, but don't really like the result. God Bless.
hmmm ok well it seems like the plastisol is the way to go i would like to start selling something thats gunna last more then a few washes.... but you are more experenced then i am could you tell me what you have seen? or maybe what did you start out with thx!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,335 Posts
I started out with a home-made press, process camera, for lithography, plate maker, heat gun, etc. Six months to get a flash, a year to get a used press, 2 years to get a conveyor dryer. Started doing transfers with a Canon color lases copier and a system where you squegeed cureable reducer on a shirt, then heat pressed the image on. All very slow and inefficient, but a learning experience out of this world.
I have shirts with inkjet transfers, Jet Pro Sofstretch paper, that have been washed 10 or more times that still look good. Not many people wear a shirt that many times.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top