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What kind of fabric paint is the best for heat pressing. I was thinking that i would use stencils to apply the paint. Is this even possible?

Sorry for my ignorance but I'm new to the game.

Thanks

Dingle
 

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I've considered doing that before... but I suspect if you pressed the shirt for as long as it would need to cure (fix) the waterbased ink correctly (generally 2-3 minutes at 180c, or 5-6 at 140, or 8-9 at 120), you'd also burn the shirt. I don't know for sure though. Even if it worked, it would be nowhere near as operator efficient as having an oven (but a lot cheaper, which is of course very relevant).

Have any of the heat pressers experimented with how long you can press a shirt for before it scorches and/or burns?
 

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When I airbrush a shirt....hairdryer dry it to speed the process as I lay new color. Then it goes into the heatpress at 350 for 25 seconds to heat set the paint. Remember to use a teflon or cover sheet so the upper platon doesnt get stained. You can scorch a white t at 375-400 degrees if you press any longer than 30 seconds.
 

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For home printing, a water based screenprinting ink. You can set it with a home iron if need be. If you can press the shirt in a heat press for long enough without burning the shirt, you could do that, but it might burn the shirt before it properly sets the ink.

In Australia/the UK/the US you can get water based screenprinting ink from any good art supply store. I don't know what art supply stores are like in Denmark, but I'd assume much the same and try that first.
 

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Nervous as I am about curing the ink with a heat press, if it can survive those temperatures in a conveyer oven or with an iron, I guess there's no reason it wouldn't be okay... I don't know, I really haven't tried it. I've always been surprised at the kind of temperatures clothing can handle - I would have thought it would at least scorch, if not combust, at the temperatures required to cure ink.
 
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