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What I have:


  • Epson WF 1100 with CIS pigment based ink
  • 15 x 15 TransPro heat press
  • T-shirts for testing
  • Sample transfer paper for lights and darks
  • Photoshop and some designs

What I don't have:


  • Print knowledge - all of my graphic work in the past has been on the web. I know print is very different and was hoping for some tips on printer settings, color modes, the heat press, pressure, etc.


  • Teflon Sheets or pillows or the like - I know I need these and will get some soon but I'm running low on finances and would like to know if there is an alternative that can be used for now. Will parchment paper used for baking help protect the platen on the press without harming my transfers? What should I use (that I can easily find at home or the grocery store) and what can I expect?

I've already searched on each separate topic of this but much of the information I find when I do so is very old, or vague.

Anyone help a newbie?
 

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Your transfer paper should come with instructions for time, temp and pressure. If not check the manufacturer's website. I do not use Photoshop so I can't advise there but if it looks good on paper, it should look good on a transfer. Just go to work and experiment a little. God Bless.
 

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Sounds like you have a great beginning. The only other piece of equipment that I can recommend would be a cutter. This will allow you to do contour cutting of your dark transfer paper and also to vinyl. A lot of times I put both a picture along with letting in vinyl on the same shirt.

You can use parchment paper instead of teflon if funds are low but some people on here say it gives a different feeling to the transfer. I just use a teflon sheet for everything. One sheet will last forever and it can be cleaned. Make sure that the parchment does not have a wax coating.
 

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You are on a good start, just now need to print some stuff up and test. Even though the manufacture will say one thing for pressure, heat, and duration; but you will find out that it may not apply to your press. Test, write down, test write down, until you get what you want. I have always recommended to newbies to have a notepad or spiral notebook, to document changes. Always, change one thing at a time soon it will become old hat. Good Luck, and PM me if you need any other help.
 

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What I have:


  • Epson WF 1100 with CIS pigment based ink
  • 15 x 15 TransPro heat press
  • T-shirts for testing
  • Sample transfer paper for lights and darks
  • Photoshop and some designs

What I don't have:


  • Print knowledge - all of my graphic work in the past has been on the web. I know print is very different and was hoping for some tips on printer settings, color modes, the heat press, pressure, etc.


  • Teflon Sheets or pillows or the like - I know I need these and will get some soon but I'm running low on finances and would like to know if there is an alternative that can be used for now. Will parchment paper used for baking help protect the platen on the press without harming my transfers? What should I use (that I can easily find at home or the grocery store) and what can I expect?

I've already searched on each separate topic of this but much of the information I find when I do so is very old, or vague.

Anyone help a newbie?
You'll want to decide whether or not to let Photoshop handle the color management, or leave it up to the Epson; they both offer it, and if you don't turn off color management in your Epson settings dialog box, it will cancel out anything you've carefully adjusted in Photoshop.

Myself, so far I'm on the fence--I started out letting PS bark all the orders, and it seemed to be the best choice. (I mostly print from Illustrator, which uses the same color management settings as PS.) Then I was unhappy with some washed-out looking colors I was getting using JPSS, so I switched to Epson's color settings. They seemed more vibrant at first, especially reds. Then I thought they were starting to look muddy. I went back to letting Adobe/PS make the decisions.

You may find that your color choices will determine your settings. (Paper choices open up a new can of worms.) I have so many custom settings in my Epson dialog box now, it's almost silly; "JPSS mattephotobrowns", that type of thing. Some time you might try a new ink. Hello, square one!

I wish there were a short cut, but I suspect there isn't one, especially with all the variables, one of which being the fact that it is 102º here today, and all my equipment is on strike. (I think I'll join them.;))

p.s. Be sure to look for "hidden" color settings within your Epson dialog box. And try printing your PSDs as CMYK and as RGB. Also fiddle with the PS document color settings, and the preview settings, and calibrate your monitor, and… well, you get the idea. Good luck!
 

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Hi Melanie
Dave here.. I'm a newbie also, in fact, I'm a newer newbie than you are ? But I can tell you this. As for Teflon and Parchment, I use both. Either will definitely keep your heat platen clean, and as everybody has said, the Teflon will last a looot longer than the Parchment ! I only use each to achieve different looks on the transfers. If I use Teflon on Opaque paper, I'll get a somewhat shiny look. With Parchment, I'll get a Matte finish. You can use either on transfer paper for Light colors and it won't change a thing because your using it on the back of the paper. So, if you want to make a change to the look of the transfer, after you peel the paper, you can do a second press while the transfer is still warm, and THEN the cover you use will make a difference. Teflon will give your transfer a slight sheen, and Parchment will kill the gloss and give you a pretty nice matte finish. Here again, it's all experimentation on you part. I'd be willing to bet you'll get pretty close to what I've described with my directions, but here again, if something changes a bit, your outcome will be a little different. So give 'er a shot and she what happens. When I was working for a living, my favorite saying ( much to my employer's chagrin ) was " well, let's see what kinda' mess I can make outta' this." They knew the outcome was going to be OK, but it still made them a little nervous :) Oh, as for buying Parchment because of limited finances. Go to the local grocery store and get Reynolds Parchment Paper for Baking. It says right on it " Does NOT contain any animal fats." The roll is 15 inches wide by 25 feet long and can be had for about 2 bucks and change. The great part is, you can custom cut it to size and shape. If you're doing shirt pocket transfers, you can actually cut them to match the shape and save some paper. Good luck and God bless...
Dave
 
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