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If I have some hand drawn designs on hard copy, what is the best way to get them print ready? Some are done in black ink but may need coloring as well. Thanks.
 

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^yes. unfortunately in this day and age doing your drawings on paper or board is just the first step in making it into a digital format...........so don't do any finish drawings, just sketches, because you are going to have to redraw/trace them once scanned into and imported or placed in an illy or photoshop file.

if you want to be a serious digital illustrator make sure you have illy, photoshop or painter availabe to you as well as a TABLET<paramount to drawing and painting in these programs.
 

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^yes. unfortunately in this day and age doing your drawings on paper or board is just the first step in making it into a digital format...........so don't do any finish drawings, just sketches, because you are going to have to redraw/trace them once scanned into and imported or placed in an illy or photoshop file.

if you want to be a serious digital illustrator make sure you have illy, photoshop or painter availabe to you as well as a TABLET<paramount to drawing and painting in these programs.
This. +1.

You can get by with an ink drawing for starters if it's extremely clean linework. But the next step is vectoring or using an auto trace like potrace or inkscape ... but you still need to clean up the points so it still passes quality control. From there you can do your color seperations and traps for all your spot colors.
 

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start looking into a Wacom tablet as well... so you can have the best of both worlds... and let me WARN YOU!!!... anything less than a Wacom isn't worth it... they don't give the nice fluid strokes you would do with a pencil... but a wacom does... so don't be quick to spend $80-$150 thinking "well it's just something that'll work for now until I get more money".... but you'll basically have a mouse that's made into a pen more than something you can draw with... there's still cool things you can do.. but sketching from scratch it can be a pain.
 

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atomicaxe is right. I've done vector traces with some peoples inked artwork and it comes out almost exactly like the original with minimal editing. Some people just have steady hands.
 

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atomicaxe is right. I've done vector traces with some peoples inked artwork and it comes out almost exactly like the original with minimal editing. Some people just have steady hands.
the inked board drawing can look clean and smooth and expertly done but even with the best tracing software it's not going to come out exactly as the scanned artwork.

you'll still spend as much time time trying to get it exactly right by cleaning it up as you will just retracing by hand.
 

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I had a 6th grade class with a sketcher among them submit a few hand fulls of classmate sketches for a shirt. I cut them together in Photoshop and then half toned them and they printed pretty much just like this.:) To get rid of the back ground clutter just select the white of the paper and increase the brightness, and no 3% dots will junk up the white.
 

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the inked board drawing can look clean and smooth and expertly done but even with the best tracing software it's not going to come out exactly as the scanned artwork.

you'll still spend as much time time trying to get it exactly right by cleaning it up as you will just retracing by hand.
This is about right. I only use inkscape when it's a quick job that doesn't call for cleanup (taking a large 8" ink drawing and using it for a 3.5" pocket for example, or if I'm doing spot halftone at 10-13 dots per inch work which you lose the clean edge anyways) or If it's got a LOT of detail in it (a super hero illustration of the owner for example) and I just go in and clean up corner points and details like the eyes (redraw if needed). I mean heck ... at least once a week I have to do a 5 minute sketch to do a quick vector on because what they want is so silly (a bull with a tutu with wings and high heel cowboy boots for example) so there isn't going to be cleanup on something like that ... my line art is pretty solid and all it takes is a custom photoshop action to smooth the burr from the paper and remove noise. And there is no way I'm wasting an hour to find stock art that is going to take me longer to make work than my 10-15 minute sketch and vector on a 20 shirt job with no art fee. It's all about the money you get paid.
 

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I had a 6th grade class with a sketcher among them submit a few hand fulls of classmate sketches for a shirt. I cut them together in Photoshop and then half toned them and they printed pretty much just like this.:) To get rid of the back ground clutter just select the white of the paper and increase the brightness, and no 3% dots will junk up the white.
yeah but the difference is you weren't producing the art for a client. if the client gives you, for example, a shell gasoline logo in a bad .jpg file, and if you think you can just auto-trace it and it will come out perfect.......you're wrong.

and i don't know any client that will accept printed tshirts with things not being perfect and pay you full price (if pay you at all) and say everything is ok.
 

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yeah but the difference is you weren't producing the art for a client. if the client gives you, for example, a shell gasoline logo in a bad .jpg file, and if you think you can just auto-trace it and it will come out perfect.......you're wrong.
Ah geez, cleaning up handwork into smooth consistent line work is another matter altogether. My bad, I scanned the post and thought that the subject was printing pencil drawings. Teach me to reply over coffee early in the day:eek:

Auto trace is great sometimes, the pen tool is great always, but sometimes labor intensive.

I'm wrong often, this time just a bit off topic. :)
 
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lol - I came to this post thinking it was about Macromedia's now Adobe's Freehand which was killed 9yrs ago. :cool:

Adobe FreeHand - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

my bad :p

To add to the topic. Adjust levels! Getting white paper to be pure white (no k value) is important. From experience, I neglected to do this step and had halftones in places I didn't want them as Shirl stated. Also set your black value to get pure blacks. Then convert to bitmap

You can try to vectorize using live trace, vectormagic, or a just redrawing the image.

[media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2TpdQL2XAvY[/media]
 
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