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I want make a black/white photo print using haltones and water based ink.What type od squeegee and what mesh count should I use?Thanks
 

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This depends on your setup. In an ideal situation, I would suggest a 70/90/70 squeegee and 305 mesh. The most crucial piece though is the dot size you output at. I would recommend nothing less than a 65 dot, and try to make it eliptical at a 20° angle.
 

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I was wondering about printing halftones with waterbased ink also. I haven't personaly worked with waterbased inks before but have had some shops do waterbased printing for us. They've told me they don't use mesh higher then 200 for water based inks because the ink dries too fast in the screen even with flooding. I have read on here at least one other shop that's able to print waterbased inks through 300+ and I'm wondering what the difference is between the shops, is it technique or specific waterbased inks or something else that makes the difference.
 

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For spot color Halftone images, I print 230 mesh with no problem and a 80 durometer squeegee. If you can get enough detail w/ a lower mesh go for it. I use Matsui and even print my CYMK images w/ 305 mesh. Much, much softer hand than plastisol CYMK...
*I wind up having to make too many squeegee passes to get sufficient coverage, if I'm printing spot color w/ 305 mesh for something simple like a black picture on a white tee.
 

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I was wondering about printing halftones with waterbased ink also. I haven't personaly worked with waterbased inks before but have had some shops do waterbased printing for us. They've told me they don't use mesh higher then 200 for water based inks because the ink dries too fast in the screen even with flooding. I have read on here at least one other shop that's able to print waterbased inks through 300+ and I'm wondering what the difference is between the shops, is it technique or specific waterbased inks or something else that makes the difference.
I would say that the difference is in the ink they used.

Regular and cheaper waterbased inks easily clogs even on 100 mesh screens. It will even clog 80 mesh screens if left for just a few minutes. My current long drying inks prints fine with 180-200 mesh screens. I have been offered inks that will print though 305 meshes with no problem, on a manual press, and will not clog even if unflooded for hours, if my supplier's guarantee is any good.

I have come to trust this particular supplier but am not prepared for the more expensive ink because most of my screens have 100-120 mesh. The frames I used for my longer drying inks have 150-180-200mesh counts. The cost of restretching frames with new higher mesh counts and current ink inventory are keeping me away from these inks for now.
 
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