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HELLO EVERYONE,

IN THIS TUTORIAL I'M GOING TO SHOW YOU HOW TO APPLY FOIL TO YOUR TSHIRTS

NOW IM USING AN ANAJET SPRINT, IF YOUR USING THE ANAJET 125 ITS THE SAME PROCEDURE.

STEP 1: Image Prep
Now before we start printing we need to get our graphic ready for print, Very simple. Now if your going to use gold foil like I am you must turn your image some sort of yellow first, (foil works better when using same color in your graphic, gold/yellow foil=yellow/gold graphics). Depending on the shade of yellow I use It will have a different effect, (ex: bright yellow will give you the brightest yellow foil, while a yellow/orange color will give you a bronze Foil)



STEP 2: General Settings
Below I have attached a screen shot of my settings, For my white underbase I used a Medium 1 (not much white needed! This is great in ink cost!)



Now for my color settings I'm using a Heavy 4 vivid
Now we need a heavy 4 because we need the ink to be nice and wet so when we apply the foil it sticks right on there.



Step 3:printing
So now that we have all of our setting dialed in, we just need to set up our shirt and print.



STEP 4:Curing

So now that we have our shirt printing we need to take it over to the heat press. You want to do this quickly because you want the ink to still be wet when you apply the foil. Place the foil Shinny side up! Like in the image below.




Now place your press sheet right over the foil.



and press your shirt.

Heat press Settings:
Were going to use our standard dark shirt settings. 330 degrees for 90 seconds.

STEP 4: FINISHING TOUCHES

So now that our shirt has been pressed were going to let it cool down for about a minute. I usually set it aside and keep my production going.



Slowly peel of the foil, make sure you pull from one direction (top to bottom or left to right etc.)

All done!!!!




 

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Thanks for the instructions and pictures! I don't own an Anajet, but I am sure this would work with other DTG printers. When you apply foil to the image, does it always stick to ALL the wet ink on the shirt? In other words, could you not have a DTG / foil hybrid print, where only a certain color is represented in foil?
In my experience with this, the foil sticks to ALL of the ink. I have gotten pretty good at multiple color foil prints by curing the first color of foil on then reregistering the shirt on the printer and doing the process over again with a different color ink. How I get my registration exact is my little secret. :D
 

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..........does it always stick to ALL the wet ink on the shirt? In other words, could you not have a DTG / foil hybrid print, where only a certain color is represented in foil?
I have not tried this process at all... but could one do a full color print, let it air dry on the machine, then do the altered artwork as a second "wet" layer for the only the foil to stick to?
 
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I don't know about multiple color foil, but think about this:

- Print white layer + CMYK (normal settings) on dark shirt.
- Flash cure the first color print, so foil will not stick to it. LEAVE SHIRT RIGHT WHERE IT IS!
- Print thin white layer + extra thick CMYK layer, where you want foil to stick (by now, the previous layer is flash cured).
- Quickly transport shirt to heat press, apply foil and press; the foil should (in theory) stick only where the fresh, wet ink has been printed, leaving the full color printed image alone......

Although I have yet to test this (odd, since I have tons of foil in my shop at the moment), I imagine it would work to do neat "multi-media" garments.
 

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Or what about creating your artwork in different layers. Where you are going to put the foil, put that in a different layer. Print the visible color ink first, but put registration marks under the place where the ink for the foil will go. Pull the garment off and cure it for a short enough time to prevent the ink from sticking. Then use the registration marks to realign the garment on the press. You can use lasers or small pins (some people use the tips of old embroidery needs and stick them into a piece of cardboard on top of the platen) to align the garment back on the platen. Print the foil layer and cure with the foil as described above. The only concern you need to have is to make sure that none of the ink is over-cured or under-cured. Must do wash tests.

The much easier and faster way would be to use inkjet light transfer paper and a vinyl cutter to apply foil. My experience is that the foil sticks better to inkjet transfer paper than dtg inks. Just requires another piece of equipment - vinyl cutter. But most people state that this is the one of the fastest piece of equipment to get an ROI back from.

Just some things to consider.

Mark
 

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Tape the cardboard to your platen. Load the garment. Print the non-foil layers with registration marks where the foil is going to be later. Put the straight pin or needle tips into the center of the registration marks. Remove and cure the garment (for how long will need to be determined, but enough to prevent the foil from attaching it). Reload the garment using the registration marks and the pins stuck in the cardboard. Remove the pins before printing. Print the ink used for the foil.

Honestly, the lasers are probably a lot easier to do and use, but they cost more money. Hope this helps.

Mark
 

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how about just using a transparency to re-register? Place the shirt back in printer, place transparancy over the shirt, print registration marks/image, adjust as necessary. If your RIP supports precise placement/sizing you can just move the image around instead of the shirt for perfect registration. works every time.
another advantage of being able to clean the transparency with alcohol and reuse.
-b
 

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How do you cure it with the pins still in, i want to give this a try
Straight pins are pushed into the cardboard through the first print on the shirt. Left the shirt up through the straight pins. Then cure the garment with the straight pins still stuck on the cardboard that is taped to you platen. Re-load the garment back on to the platen after first print is cured to the right amount. Use the pins stuck into the cardboard and push the pins through the shirt directly through the registration marks.
Then remove the pins.

Again, this is an old method that is time consuming. It is not always 100% accurate (i.e. pins can come out if you are not careful, shirts can get stretched out,...). I would recommend the laser concept over the pins for better accuracy and speed, but it cost more. There are pros and cons to everything.

Mark
 

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how about just using a transparency to re-register? Place the shirt back in printer, place transparancy over the shirt, print registration marks/image, adjust as necessary. If your RIP supports precise placement/sizing you can just move the image around instead of the shirt for perfect registration. works every time.
another advantage of being able to clean the transparency with alcohol and reuse.
-b
Might need more explanation. Seems like a lot of trial and error if the transparency can be moved. But in the end, it is a lot like the lasers that provide a visual mark on the top of the garment.

Mark
 

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I'm going to try this cardboard and pins method. It seems pretty simple...pretty disappointed that I didn't think about it before :)

After some trial and error, I've been using chalk marks on dark/colored shirts and pen marks on scotch tape on white shirts. Also, layering your images like DAGuide said does make it a lot easier!
 

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Might need more explanation. Seems like a lot of trial and error if the transparency can be moved. But in the end, it is a lot like the lasers that provide a visual mark on the top of the garment.

Mark
The transparency provides exact information on how far the print is offset from the garment below. You nudge the graphic in the software until it aligns, the transparency protects the garment below until the alignment is perfect.
This is a quick and inexpensive method and requires no additional hardware and there is no risk that the laser moves or gets bumped or otherwise misaligned. With a transparency you can move it around all you want but the image will always print in the same spot in relation to the platen and shirt below.
If your RIP software provides precise information on where the edges of the graphic are on the platen (left, right, top bottom) it literally takes seconds to move the graphic in the two dimensions.
Not all rip does this, I know DTG Rip V04p does not but you can still use the nudge method.
-b
 

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I understand what you are saying. My experience is that you would probably have to tape the transparency to the garment or it will slip when the platen goes back into the printer. This might not be an issue for those dtg printers where the platen does not move as long as the airflow of the print engine moving forward and back (especially in the beginning or end) does not cause the transparency to move.

I think it is one of those things needs to be done to see the viability in a shop. At least one company has been selling lasers in this industry since 2003. I have seen them installed on automatic screen presses, dtg printers, embroidery machines and heat presses. They retained the alignment. The only thing you need to make sure of is that the lasers have focusable lens so you can get a crisp line.

In the end, there are more than one way to do this. Just need to find out what works for you. Keep the good ideas coming.

Mark
 

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Of course there are many ways to do this.

The transparency method is free (unless you count the cost of a sheet of acetate). You're already set up if you know how to place a shirt on a platen and print on it.
There is no power, cabling, rigging, or any other setup. You just add a transparency on top of the shirt, print on that then nudge in software until registration is perfect. You don't need to print the whole image either just a fraction to confirm registration.
The transparency can be reused indefinitely when cleaned with alcohol.

Why make it easy when you can make it complicated and charge money for it ;)
 

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oh and if it moves during loading from the motor etc, scotch tape solves the problem although I never had that happen and we use 2 brands of printers (one is conveyor based, one has a front loading platen)
 
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