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I ran across this forum today and have really enjoyed the content and feedback. I am considering starting a home based business using heat press and plastisol transfers. Originally wanted to do screen printing but the cost, space requirements and inks/chemicals are a turn-off.

Only concern so far about heat transfers is pricing against traditional screen printers. My target customers will be small to medium size business as well as school, church, club and team opportunities.

Any feedback from home based individuals would be very welcome.
 

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Colorfast said:
Only concern so far about heat transfers is pricing against traditional screen printers. My target customers will be small to medium size business as well as school, church, club and team opportunities.

Any feedback from home based individuals would be very welcome.
:welcome:

why not do both. Source out to screen printers when you need a lot of shirts made that you already pre-sold.

And do the plastisol for designs you will be printing shirts as you need.

Plastisol can also be a strong point when you operate as a middle man home buiseness. Like:

You can set up accounts, a restaurant for example. They would order shirts for their staff and also display them for sale. " Joe's Stone Crab " to clients, or give them away etc. so you can fill their orders as they need. :D

When using plastisol you can easily change the t-shirt color/size/style etc too... no need to stock the printed shirts, just paper...ideal for home buiseness with a 15x15 press.
 

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Colorfast said:
Only concern so far about heat transfers is pricing against traditional screen printers. My target customers will be small to medium size business as well as school, church, club and team opportunities.
You don't need to be the cheapest in order to make a living (for two reasons: 1) You can sell yourself up on other qualities, or 2) You can thrive on people's ignorance - both work), so you can still compete.
 

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Aye, Solmu beat me too it. Price is only one of many factors; you don't need to be the cheapest game in town to get customers. Work on other areas instead, e.g. have good customer service, use quality materials, etc. Also, if you ask groups like that directly, or if you are affiliated with them in some way, they may go with you even if they know someone else could do it cheaper.

One final note you can consider: you can give discounts to non-profit organizations as a tax write off.
 
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