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Discussion Starter #1
Hello, today I tried again to do some mugs, I bought a new Photo-Trans ImageClip for mugs. Same **** that the previous Mugs n More. Five more mugs ruined.
So I think I am giving up on using my laser printer for doing mugs. I am so frustrated :mad:
Tried different pressures, times, temperatures and nothing really work.
I already ruined over twenty or more mugs before, trying to learn how to do it. But I don't think I am that stupid. Probably 9 or 10 were successfully done off a box of 36.
This time a customer asked for some mugs, and it didn't work.
I have read that many people are using their laser printer for mugs, and just wondering what I am doing wrong.
BUT now I am willing to jump to a TRULY sub dye (mug making ) system. So I am asking for some help on what package (if any) I can get for around $1000. I already have several Epson printer, among them a C88+, that I could use as a dedicated mugs printer.

A am using a mugs press off eBay, so probably that is something to consider to replace.

I am all ears.

Thank you.

P.s I know it has been discussed so many times before, but technology changes, and there may be a good deal somewhere I am not aware of.
 

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dood, over here on the aircraft carrier .........err UK ( u.s. navy joke)
we are told that laser is for soft use not hard.
Mugs are hard.
We are advised to go for a dye sub set up and I see no reason why that should be any different on your side of the pond. Check out on line auction sites and look for small printer options, why spend the big bucks.
 

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I have also tried the "mugs n' more" (from Neenah) and the "multi-trans" (from forever) and I had the same problems. Really frustrating. I was thinking that laser transfer for mugs would be cheaper to do than dye-sub because with laser mug transfers, one should be able to print on regular type mugs, not the coated special ones for dye-sub. But maybe I was wrong because I noted that Forever Germany also sells mugs for their papers. Could this be the case? I also noted that HIX sells some sort of a "mug glazer" machine which you use after pressing on the mug press. Could this be a requirement for the "mugs n' more" transfer papers? I have the "non-contact" type mug press from Forever and I'll post the video later.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I too am in the sublimation camp. It is just too difficult for me to get consistent results from transfer
paper unto mugs.
Is it just you (and for that matters, me) or is it the way it works (or doesn't) ?
Even sublimation is not very consistent from one transfer to the next?
Out of a box of 36 I transferred only about 10 mugs, with laser transfer , Mugs' n More, first, and then PhotoTrans Imageclip for mugs.
How are done those nice very professional looking mugs I see everywhere?
 

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I use Dye sublimation, never had a problem with the mugs from Cactus Coat. As far as the laser
goes any laser transfer must be cured after pressing, for mugs you can use a mug glazer, for other flat items an electric stove set to 400 degrees for 6-20 minutes depending on the thickness of the material.
I the flea market I operate out of a guy does laser and uses a heat dryer (blow dryer typ) set up with the spreader tip but then again I use one of his plates to show why mine are so much better. But on mugs get
Cactus coat mugs good consitant coatings, lots of sizes color changing also. Hope this helps.

Joe
 

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I use inkjet sublimation onto ceramic mugs and never have any problems at all. If I am understanding the Forever web site information correctly though, they are talking about using laser sublimation onto standard mugs that do not have a sublimation coating? I would not have thought that 'universal glaze' for ceramic mugs existed, so would assume that a laser transfer would be tattoed onto the surface of the glaze, rather than below it? Anyone using laser, I'd be interested to know if that is correct (or not).
 

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The Forever folks are referring to normal toners. The mugs still need to be coated but with a softer coating. You press then place the mug in a glazing unit that bakes the toner into the coating.
 

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I use inkjet sublimation onto ceramic mugs and never have any problems at all. If I am understanding the Forever web site information correctly though
Tw0 or three questions here if I may.

Aree you saying that you inkjet with pigment inks onto mugs please? What mugs normal sublimugs or anything?

Forever, is their laser route a good one for hard goods ? I thought laser was only good for soft applications like t's and mousemats,bags etc.

can someone help before I drown in indecision please:)
 

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Thanks for the clarification David. I am sure a lot of people reading this thread would be a little confused by the Forever videos.

Inkjet sublimation mugs tend to be expensive when compared with other types of printable mugs, but the outstanding print quality makes them well worth the extra expense.

** Special dye sublimation ink in printer, onto coated sublimation mugs. Wish pigment ink did work.**
 

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Using the Forever paper, you will print with a color laser printer not inkjet using Normal toners.

I am in love with sublimation for hard substrates. I have had limited success with transfer papers onto
hard substrates.
 

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The Forever folks are referring to normal toners. The mugs still need to be coated but with a softer coating. You press then place the mug in a glazing unit that bakes the toner into the coating.
Thanks David. What sort of softer coating could this be? I understand also that Conde sells the Multi-Trans transfer papers from Forever. Are you having limited success with the Multi-trans on hard substrates?
 

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My wife and I have been using Dye-Sub. for about 12 years. We tried all most every new thing that came out. But for hard surfaces, Dye-Sub gives the best image, plus being easy and quick makes up for the cost. If you have a epson use it. But I learned if you plan on doing a lot of printing get a 4000 or 4800. But we also found that if you do not us it often, run a print or two every week. this helps avoid clogging, and other problems. I learned that form David G. An trust me he knows Dye-Sub. I whould have given up years ago if knot for him.

Marty & Belinda
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Thank you all guys for all the help, I am going to switch to sublimation, now I just have to decide what brand of ink (if there is more than one ) and CIS I have to get.
How many of you prefer ink in bags rather than the plastic bottles, what is the advantage/con of each?
 
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