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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We are thinking about getting into sublimation. We have been looking at ProWorlds starter packages. We just don't know which one to go with. They have the SG400, SG800.


They also have the mug starter packages available.


It was mentioned to me that we could also sublimate using a microwave for mugs but I am not sure how that works. Anyone have an idea how that works.


Seeking advice on this.
 

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Hi. I have a Ricoh SG3110DN. Much the same as an SG400, but I'm not tied to hideously expensive Sawgrass inks.


Micowave? Never heard of that being done. You have to use silicone wraps when using an oven and the metal clamps wouldn't fair well in a microwave! I use standard mug presses and also have a halogen cooker (along with silicone mug wraps) for whenever I need a full-area print.


If your going into the sublimation business don't cut too many corners or you will end up with a ton of seemingly unsurmountable problems. Also, use mugs with good quality coatings, there's a lot of crap out there, so use recommended suppliers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi. I have a Ricoh SG3110DN. Much the same as an SG400, but I'm not tied to hideously expensive Sawgrass inks.


Micowave? Never heard of that being done. You have to use silicone wraps when using an oven and the metal clamps wouldn't fair well in a microwave! I use standard mug presses and also have a halogen cooker (along with silicone mug wraps) for whenever I need a full-area print.


If your going into the sublimation business don't cut too many corners or you will end up with a ton of seemingly unsurmountable problems. Also, use mugs with good quality coatings, there's a lot of crap out there, so use recommended suppliers.
I meant to say oven
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi. I have a Ricoh SG3110DN. Much the same as an SG400, but I'm not tied to hideously expensive Sawgrass inks.


Micowave? Never heard of that being done. You have to use silicone wraps when using an oven and the metal clamps wouldn't fair well in a microwave! I use standard mug presses and also have a halogen cooker (along with silicone mug wraps) for whenever I need a full-area print.


If your going into the sublimation business don't cut too many corners or you will end up with a ton of seemingly unsurmountable problems. Also, use mugs with good quality coatings, there's a lot of crap out there, so use recommended suppliers.


Where can I purchase the Ricoh SG3110DN?
 

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Why don't you take an Epson fine art/photo printer ? Quality is better and ink become cheaper
So then any printer can be used as a sublimation printer as long as we use sublimation ink? I thought it had to be a special printer?
Only printers with piezo printheads are suitable for sublimation. This usually means Ricohs and most Epsons for the majority of people.

You asked previously where to buy a Ricoh 3110. I'm from the UK so can't really advise you on that. However, think carefully about what size of printer you need to be able to fulfil all the product types you envisage selling.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Only printers with piezo printheads are suitable for sublimation. This usually means Ricohs and most Epsons for the majority of people.

You asked previously where to buy a Ricoh 3110. I'm from the UK so can't really advise you on that. However, think carefully about what size of printer you need to be able to fulfil all the product types you envisage selling.
I would say that I will need a printer that can print at least 11 inches (28 CM) wide, maybe up to 13 inches (28 cm).
 

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Why don't you take an Epson fine art/photo printer ? Quality is better and ink become cheaper
So then any printer can be used as a sublimation printer as long as we use sublimation ink? I thought it had to be a special printer?
If you're after an A3 printer at a reasonable price then probably Epson is the best option. You can save a lot of money by using third-party inks instead of genuine inks but make sure you buy them from a reputable supplier with a good track record. You can go the continuous-ink route (CISS) or use refillable cartridges. Both have pro's and con's.

With heat presses it's sometimes advantageous to buy a used press with a good name rather than a new, cheap, unbranded Chinese press.

Whatever you buy just remember that sublimation is very much a 'suck-it-and-see' business. You'll need to do lots of experiments at the beginning, starting with suggested settings then refining them to match your printer, inks, paper, press and substrates to achieve the perfect print.

With regards to graphics software, you'll need software that can manage colours via an ICC profile (which should be supplied to match your inks from your ink supplier). So here we're talking Photoshop or the free Gimp for raster work, or Coreldraw, Illustrator or the free Inkscape for vector work.
 

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Hi. I have a Ricoh SG3110DN. Much the same as an SG400, but I'm not tied to hideously expensive Sawgrass inks.


Micowave? Never heard of that being done. You have to use silicone wraps when using an oven and the metal clamps wouldn't fair well in a microwave! I use standard mug presses and also have a halogen cooker (along with silicone mug wraps) for whenever I need a full-area print.


If your going into the sublimation business don't cut too many corners or you will end up with a ton of seemingly unsurmountable problems. Also, use mugs with good quality coatings, there's a lot of crap out there, so use recommended suppliers.
Not everyone aware of this ...

http://www.freepatentsonline.com/7329631.pdf
 

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We are thinking about getting into sublimation. We have been looking at ProWorlds starter packages. We just don't know which one to go with. They have the SG400, SG800.


They also have the mug starter packages available.


It was mentioned to me that we could also sublimate using a microwave for mugs but I am not sure how that works. Anyone have an idea how that works.


Seeking advice on this.
Technically a microwave can be used ... practically I don't know, but the principle behind it is sound science.

http://www.freepatentsonline.com/7329631.pdf

But you would have to pay to license it since it's been patented. :)

There are some Microwave that are dual function, microwave + convection oven. I have one of these I got maybe 10 years ago. I don't use the microwave function, but it's nice as a convection oven since the carousel rotates around and the substrate gets even heating. It was a little larger than the toaster ovens that were avaialble so I didn't mind spending a few bucks more for the feature.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I have an Epson 1430 printer that I use to print my positives for screenprinting. Can I just change the ink cartridges to sublimation inks and use that or would that damage the printer since I have been using it with regular ink.
 

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I have an Epson 1430 printer that I use to print my positives for screenprinting. Can I just change the ink cartridges to sublimation inks and use that or would that damage the printer since I have been using it with regular ink.
You can switch ink with no problem, just print a few pages full of color charts after swaping so you are sure all the old ink is gone
 

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You can switch ink with no problem, just print a few pages full of color charts after swaping so you are sure all the old ink is gone
Can I go back and forth as needed? I feel like I would be wasting ink just to clear the inks.
I would say yes. And yes it does waste some ink but sublimation ink is affordable (except Sawgrass)
 
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