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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

When curing using a heat press, after I would have both front and back dry to the touch using a heat gun, could I cure both side of the shirt at the same time using a heat press?

So if there is a design on the front and the back of the shirt (and they are dry to the touch) would the heat press do the job for both front and back? Or do I have to cure the front and then cure the back separately?

Also, along those lines, if I do cure the front separately and then cure the back later - would that be a bad thing and hurt the shirt?

I'm new to the heat press.

Also how long and with what temperature do people use? I've read different things, and am not sure.

Thanks!
 

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the ideal drying procedure of your ink will depend on the brand and their instructions for curing.

Heat presses are not generally the ideal curing method because of the way water based ink is cured; first removing the moisture then drying at a certain temp for a certain amount of time.

With a press, it is difficult to get the moisture removed as there is no room for it to escape.

What type of ink are you using?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I know what you mean.

I'm not going to buy a forced air flash dryer or conveyor so I figure this is better than ironing and/or heat gun only. But, I could be wrong. Would you say this is correct?

I plan to use Permaset Aqua inks. I did see the instructions but they don't refer to the heat press.

The plan was to use a heat gun to make them dry to the touch and then heat press. Not sure how long, or the answers to my questions in the first post. If you or anyone knows, that'd be excellent to hear what you think.

Thank you.
 

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With permaset, you don't necessarily have to first use a heat gun. The ink will air dry.

You do need a heat source eventually, and actually a heat gun can be used to cure. I think this might be a better choice than a press. Remember, a heat gun is a forced air dryer too. :)

Ryonet has a series of videos on youtube describing the different drying methods for water based ink. They show how to do it with a heat gun as one of the options.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks, so Permaset does say it's ok to iron or "bake" the shirt. Isn't ironing the same thing as a heat press? Or maybe not?

Thanks a lot.
 

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Thanks, so Permaset does say it's ok to iron or "bake" the shirt. Isn't ironing the same thing as a heat press? Or maybe not?

Thanks a lot.
Essentially, but remember, when you're ironing, you're moving the iron around some allowing the moisture to escape. With a heat press, you're sealing the moisture in. I've heard of people using a heat press by 'hovering' the press an inch or so above the design. That seems like it might work ok. Test, test, test!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thats a great idea. Now I am also considering Matsui. Anyone have any tests regarding Permaset versus Matsui? I searched, but didn't see a clear winner.
 

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I've used a heat press to cure waterbased, I let the ink dry for 10 minutes near a fan heater then I press for 60 seconds then released the press to let moisture out then pressed again for 60 seconds. It's had a few washes with no change.

There are additives that you can put in the ink so it air cures without heating. Not tried any though.
 

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Thats a great idea. Now I am also considering Matsui. Anyone have any tests regarding Permaset versus Matsui? I searched, but didn't see a clear winner.
Funny you should ask.

We've recently been testing the Permaset line. I'm very, very impressed with it. I always regarded permaset as a 'hobby/craft' ink. But I was wrong.

It's very similar to Matsui. Easy to work with, extremely soft on lights, vibrant colors. But the main difference that I really like is Permaset makes a first down white which allows you to print the regular colors on darks as well. The Matsui RC colors don't work on an underbase.
 
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