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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
First Time Sublimation User - Looking For Tips (MAC users)

Hello all,

I am another new user to the forum looking to learn about sublimating and am hoping for some tips on whether my set up and what I think I should be doing is correct. I hate to be lengthy, but I don't want to leave out crucial information that will get asked anyway (I've read many beginners posts here.)

I've spent many hours and many days reading all that I can about sublimating and I feel like I know enough to start. I am a sole person looking to do this from home so my set up looks like this:

iMac and Macbook Pro (questions regarding printing from MAC to come later)
Epson Artisan 1430 (new)
InkXPro XPRO III series CISS + ink
DyeTrans (Conde) 13 x 19 multipurpose paper
DyeTrans 3.5" x 7" (100 sheet pack) - For mugs specifically
5 in 1 Heat Press 15x15
Photoshop CS6 (about all I'll really be using for my images)

I suppose what I really want to ask is how to calibrate my printer to my Apple computers? InkxPro doesn't have an ICC profile for MAC and when I called them over the phone, I was told that many people use the Adobe RGB 1998 profile which from what I've read is not a printing profile, yet works for some? I also read something about using Parallels or Bootcamp to run Windows to install said ICC profile (would rather not if possible.)

I know I need to calibrate my monitor as well. I read that Apple has a self monitor calibration built in from this article:

http://www.peachpit.com/articles/article.aspx?p=1350901&seqNum=3

It's from 2009 but most of the steps were the same and noticed a slight change in color after completing this. I know it's not a proper method without buying a Colormunki device but I want to test my prints before resorting to something like that.

Since I'm working on a desktop printer and not sending transfers out to a shop, I read I should be set up in RGB and not sRGB. Is this advisable? This would be done through Photoshop correct? Since I created a new calibration profile, would I use that as my printing profile in the print menu on Photoshop? Rendering Intent set to Perceptual? Photoshop manages colors correct?

I've gone on too long and confusing even myself. I'm looking to get the attention of MAC users who print using the 1430 who can give me some pointers on how to calibrate as best as I can with what I'm currently working with. That's my primary concern, anything else I can address later.

Any help I can get I'd appreciate. I'll continue looking through old posts for anything relative to my situation in hopes of not repeating what should be obvious or accessible from the search function. Apologies again for the lengthy intro.

Thank you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I have my printer set up with my CISS finally, I thought I messed up filling the first color but nozzle check looks to be good.

I realize I posted at a time during low traffic here but since I am all set up and ready to go without any responses to work off of, I am going to print out a sample or two based on what I read and THINK my settings should be set up as, press it to a mug and go from there.
 

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Sorry to respond so informal but through all the info you gave you left out providing your name. :)

I can't help you much with your desktop set-up as we are a large format sublimation shop, printing and profiling exclusively trough a windows-based work flow.

I will advise you to test your colors and output on 100% poly fabric until you get reproduction of colors as you desire them to be.

Don't waste blanks and/or expensive substrates merely testing and tweaking colors.

Just my 14 years of sublimation advice.

Hope this helps and I wish you good fortune with your sublimation endeavors.

Jae
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Sorry to respond so informal but through all the info you gave you left out providing your name. :)

I can't help you much with your desktop set-up as we are a large format sublimation shop, printing and profiling exclusively trough a windows-based work flow.

I will advise you to test your colors and output on 100% poly fabric until you get reproduction of colors as you desire them to be.

Don't waste blanks and/or expensive substrates merely testing and tweaking colors.

Just my 14 years of sublimation advice.

Hope this helps and I wish you good fortune with your sublimation endeavors.

Jae
Thanks Jae! My name is Jose.

I've read similar suggestions as what you advised regarding experimenting with colors and settings on 100% poly fabric rather than expensive blanks or substrates, but wouldn't I have to press a few items to truly find what colors/settings work best since the colors on a transfer paper are not indicative of the final product? Or do the colors on a 100% poly fabric reflect the finish of a properly sublimated product as if heat pressed?

I'm willing to experiment with the 3.5 x 7" paper for phone cases/mugs since I got the 100 sheet pack for free thanks to my Conde representative. I tried printing an image for a mug on said paper this morning and it was printing way off margin/hardly at all on the sheet. I don't know if it was me being awake for 24 hours at that point that I was messing up something so trivial as paper/document size but obviously I was doing something wrong because I couldn't get it to print correctly after 3 tries on two sheets. I gave it a break for the rest of the day until now. I want to try printing something on a 13x19 sheet which will be about 3/4 of what I will need for most projects.

Any help with print settings / document set up through photoshop for the mug specific paper is what I'm now looking to figure out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hey Derek,

Thank you! I think I figured that out by watching a video where they included that. I applied that knowledge to my left over paper from a 13x19 sheet which worked out well so that should explain it.

So far everything seems to be working well. I'm still trying to figure out the appropriate amount of time to press a mug without having my blacks turn brownish. I tried 3 separate mugs at 6 minutes, 4 and 3. The colors from the 3 minute mug seem to be slightly light and don't pop as much, so I'm thinking 4 minutes is probably best. I think I read something about the images pressing onto the mug differently on the top and bottom edges? The 3 minute mug showed a bit of blurriness on the bottom edge. Should I not print my images that close to the edges to prevent this?
 

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Thanks Jae! My name is Jose.

I've read similar suggestions as what you advised regarding experimenting with colors and settings on 100% poly fabric rather than expensive blanks or substrates, but wouldn't I have to press a few items to truly find what colors/settings work best since the colors on a transfer paper are not indicative of the final product? Or do the colors on a 100% poly fabric reflect the finish of a properly sublimated product as if heat pressed?
The imaged fabric WILL reflect the finish of a properly sublimated product because it IS heat pressed Jose. Fabric is a product as well just a more cost efficient substrate when dialing in color.

The fabric will reflect proper color when dialing your profile. Hard substrates will reflect color differently but nothing outside a point or two (at least it shouldn't be). Don't worry about what the paper looks like (after a while you will be able to look at paper and tell where your colors will be post press but that isn't a concern right now) focus on post-pressing results.
 

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We always press our mugs at 180c for 200 seconds, cool immediately in just boiled water from the kettle then they can be cooled to cold after that.
never had a prob with cracking or ghosting etc and always look great.
If you intend to go to the bottom edge of the mug preheat the bottom by putting it in your flat press with the bottom against the heater (because it will always be cooler than the sides in a normal mug press and this gives it a fighting chance to stay hot right to the bottom) and then use mug press straight away after wrapping
Poly fabric is just that, but if you use a shiny material the colours will look crisp and a shirt material will look slightly less so. (better weave 'resolution' on the shiny)
 

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Thanks for the tip. I'm using a 5 in 1 heat press, so I can't exactly switch from the main, flat press to the mug press as I'd have to switch the heating element from one to the other. I've tried just putting the mug itself in the mug press about a 1/4" in and adding some pressure so that only the bottom edge is preheated. Unsure if it's making a difference or not.
 

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We have never heated the bottom of mugs before pressing. We just wrap the dyesub image on the mug, wrap a piece of blowout paper around that, and then put in the press. We use 400F (204C) for about 4 mins and they come out perfect every time.
(This is for our DK3's, using 11oz and 15oz mugs)

In ovens we do basically the same thing but for a longer time (usually doing about a dozen at a time).
 

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Re: First Time Sublimation User - Looking For Tips (MAC users)

Any remaining questions?
I would do a solid black transfer to calibrate your mugs. Watch your timer, does it start right away or does it wait until you reach press temp?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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We have never heated the bottom of mugs before pressing. We just wrap the dyesub image on the mug, wrap a piece of blowout paper around that, and then put in the press. We use 400F (204C) for about 4 mins and they come out perfect every time.
(This is for our DK3's, using 11oz and 15oz mugs)

In ovens we do basically the same thing but for a longer time (usually doing about a dozen at a time).
Putting our mugs in a press for more than 200 seconds destroys the blacks, so would having a higher temperature than 180c which would probably melt the surface of the paper into the surface of the mug.
glad it works for you though, each man to his own as they say.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
My blacks have actually been pretty good. I still occasionally have a minor issue with the top or bottom edge, nothing too crazy but enough for my perfectionist self to be unsatisfied.

I also recently purchased 15oz mugs and my first three attempts also had top/bottom fading issues using the same time/temp as my 11oz mugs, except with a little more pressure.
 

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My blacks have actually been pretty good. I still occasionally have a minor issue with the top or bottom edge, nothing too crazy but enough for my perfectionist self to be unsatisfied.

I also recently purchased 15oz mugs and my first three attempts also had top/bottom fading issues using the same time/temp as my 11oz mugs, except with a little more pressure.
which mug press are you using?
 

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Hello Jose,

I've been printing sublimation ink heat transfers since 1987 and although I only understand about 10% of what there is, I'll try to give you some input.

Me? Started with an AB **** mimeo printer (waste of money(, 3M copier (could only do one ink color). Invented Colorprint1 and using the electronic stencils, was able to print full color sub transfers with perfect registration BUT the technology disappeared along with the suppliers so I started working with inkjet printers.

When I started there weren't very many blanks available: mugs, t-shirts, mouse pads, etc.. but now there are so many products, it'll make your head spin. Even wood.

Anyways, in early 1994 I made videos on how to use sub transfers. These are old videos but the process then is still the same as how we do it today. I've posted the step-by-step instructions at my new website but I am not allowed to post the url here. It's free and nothing to join and nothing for sale there. Just my old instructions.

I use Windows and have the Ricoh SG 3110DN printer. Love it and the color profiles from Conde are spot on. I buy my sub inks from a place other than Conde and colors come out great, consistently.
I use a mug press from China (I'm pretty sure) and I use the 11 oz. white mugs from Thailand from Conde. I do NOT do full bleed as I make my artwork about 3.2" high and keep the outside edges of the actual transfer ink about 3/4" from the handle. I heat press at 400 degrees for 3 minutes 15 seconds using medium pressure. When I close the handle, I can feel resistance but the handle closes easy.

I only apply one piece of heat tape to the ends of the sub transfer then place half a sheet of plain white bond paper over it then slide it all into the mugs press.
When done, I open the press grab the mug by the handle and slide the mug out. Remove the heat tape and set to the side. Remove the white blank cover sheet and throw it away. Do not reusue it.

In my new HD videos I suggest that whenever you print any kind of heat transfer (sub or pigmented ink) and when you heat press it and something goes wrong, always write on the transfer the ink used, time in the heat press, temperature, pressure and anything else you can think of. When you correct the problem, write down the information on the NEW used transfer and what you did to correct it. Save 'em as you may run into the same problem and you'll have a nice library for reference.

I could go on but it appears you are trying to work with a Mac and a printer I am unfamiliar with so I'll leave it to the Mac experts to help sort it out for you.

I hope this little bit of information helps and always feel free to post here and I'll try my best to help.

Fred
Melbourne FL
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Hello Jose,

I've been printing sublimation ink heat transfers since 1987 and although I only understand about 10% of what there is, I'll try to give you some input.

Me? Started with an AB **** mimeo printer (waste of money(, 3M copier (could only do one ink color). Invented Colorprint1 and using the electronic stencils, was able to print full color sub transfers with perfect registration BUT the technology disappeared along with the suppliers so I started working with inkjet printers.

When I started there weren't very many blanks available: mugs, t-shirts, mouse pads, etc.. but now there are so many products, it'll make your head spin. Even wood.

Anyways, in early 1994 I made videos on how to use sub transfers. These are old videos but the process then is still the same as how we do it today. I've posted the step-by-step instructions at my new website but I am not allowed to post the url here. It's free and nothing to join and nothing for sale there. Just my old instructions.

I use Windows and have the Ricoh SG 3110DN printer. Love it and the color profiles from Conde are spot on. I buy my sub inks from a place other than Conde and colors come out great, consistently.
I use a mug press from China (I'm pretty sure) and I use the 11 oz. white mugs from Thailand from Conde. I do NOT do full bleed as I make my artwork about 3.2" high and keep the outside edges of the actual transfer ink about 3/4" from the handle. I heat press at 400 degrees for 3 minutes 15 seconds using medium pressure. When I close the handle, I can feel resistance but the handle closes easy.

I only apply one piece of heat tape to the ends of the sub transfer then place half a sheet of plain white bond paper over it then slide it all into the mugs press.
When done, I open the press grab the mug by the handle and slide the mug out. Remove the heat tape and set to the side. Remove the white blank cover sheet and throw it away. Do not reusue it.

In my new HD videos I suggest that whenever you print any kind of heat transfer (sub or pigmented ink) and when you heat press it and something goes wrong, always write on the transfer the ink used, time in the heat press, temperature, pressure and anything else you can think of. When you correct the problem, write down the information on the NEW used transfer and what you did to correct it. Save 'em as you may run into the same problem and you'll have a nice library for reference.

I could go on but it appears you are trying to work with a Mac and a printer I am unfamiliar with so I'll leave it to the Mac experts to help sort it out for you.

I hope this little bit of information helps and always feel free to post here and I'll try my best to help.

Fred
Melbourne FL
Thanks for the info Fred. I've been writing down the temp/time/pressure once I know I've found what is ideal for my setup so I don't forget or for future reference. Things seem to be going well at the moment.
 
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