T-Shirt Forums banner

21 - 35 of 35 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #21
I've only ever used clamshell presses so far. I'm looking at buying another soon and am debating with myself what would be better for my setup. Although I like the idea of a swing away press and love the look and design of the Hotronix Fusion I can't help thinking that an auto open clamshell would be faster and easier. I mainly DTG but do the odd vinyl or sublimation job now and then.
I think I have decided to go with a standard heat press nd but a hat, and cup press separate. I want to spend around $300 for my first heat press and it needs to be no smaller than 15 x 15. any suggestions?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
I first bought the highest rated 15x15 press on Amazon. 5k people thought it was was the best thing ever and it was awesome for HTV. Sublimating on it is an entirely different story. After going through a few blanks, I bought a ir thermometer. Heat ranged from 335 degrees to 385 degrees on the platen. The areas under 385 degrees appeared faded and in some areas which were supposed to be black were a medium gray.

Lesson learned about buying cheap heat presses.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #23
I first bought the highest rated 15x15 press on Amazon. 5k people thought it was was the best thing ever and it was awesome for HTV. Sublimating on it is an entirely different story. After going through a few blanks, I bought a ir thermometer. Heat ranged from 335 degrees to 385 degrees on the platen. The areas under 385 degrees appeared faded and in some areas which were supposed to be black were a medium gray.

Lesson learned about buying cheap heat presses.
This is what I have found recently. For $600 it looks to be more commercial type with the attachments. Does anybody have any recommendations on this product?
272823
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Your heat press will either make or break your business. Dye sub requires 400 degrees, or sometimes higher on certain non-wearable items. The hobby or less expensive presses will not run at 400 degrees for very long. They will burn out and they won't have the proper amount of heat elements to sublimate consistently. Then you are out of business until you purchase what you should have bought to begin with. You will have wasted the money you spent. You are much better off with a used, quality machine than saving a few bucks up front.
If the better presses are out of your price range then maybe you should rethink your business plan.
Also, 400 degrees is not something you want aimed at you for very long. With a clam shell press you will quickly learn to hate it. The swing away models keep the heat pointed at the floor. It's still a very warm job but not like you would experience with a clam shell.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Geo Knight is the safest bet. Quality service and warrantee exceed others. We rarely sell any others. Consider what things will be like ten years from now when the Geo Knight is still producing and other brands will have needed replacing at the least one time, probably more. Don't consider a product that does not have parts readily available in the U.S.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #29
Your heat press will either make or break your business. Dye sub requires 400 degrees, or sometimes higher on certain non-wearable items. The hobby or less expensive presses will not run at 400 degrees for very long. They will burn out and they won't have the proper amount of heat elements to sublimate consistently. Then you are out of business until you purchase what you should have bought to begin with. You will have wasted the money you spent. You are much better off with a used, quality machine than saving a few bucks up front.
If the better presses are out of your price range then maybe you should rethink your business plan.
Also, 400 degrees is not something you want aimed at you for very long. With a clam shell press you will quickly learn to hate it. The swing away models keep the heat pointed at the floor. It's still a very warm job but not like you would experience with a clam shell.
I went today and looked at a hotronics heat press that was 20 years old. They wanted $700 for it but it took 15 minutes to get up to 350 degrees. It was missing a screw in the front and I really don't feel comfortable with it. My biggest question is can I get parts for a device that old and who would I get to fix it? That is something I also have to ask myself. I'm still thinking about it but not sure at the moment what to do...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Geo Knight is the safest bet. Quality service and warrantee exceed others. We rarely sell any others. Consider what things will be like ten years from now when the Geo Knight is still producing and other brands will have needed replacing at the least one time, probably more. Don't consider a product that does not have parts readily available in the U.S.
I agree, if you only want to buy one press the a Sefa or Geoknight are both safe bets. It will become an a lifelong friend, they just last forever and the warranty they offer is testament to their reliability.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
If you're on the budget, this would do the job and it's well below $300.

That is the exact press I bought on Amazon with 5k positive reviews. Works great for HTV but not suitable for sublimation.

Uneven platen temps vary by over 50 degrees.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
I think I have decided to go with a standard heat press nd but a hat, and cup press separate. I want to spend around $300 for my first heat press and it needs to be no smaller than 15 x 15. any suggestions?
I think that spending $300 is simply too much. You could find what you're looking for at a cheaper price.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
I first bought the highest rated 15x15 press on Amazon. 5k people thought it was was the best thing ever and it was awesome for HTV. Sublimating on it is an entirely different story. After going through a few blanks, I bought a ir thermometer. Heat ranged from 335 degrees to 385 degrees on the platen. The areas under 385 degrees appeared faded and in some areas which were supposed to be black were a medium gray.

Lesson learned about buying cheap heat presses.
It's good to know that you feel comfortable with what you bought. Do you think you spent too much money or the opposite?
 
21 - 35 of 35 Posts
Top