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Hi everyone,

Spent the last hour searching and reading the forum to see if the answers i needed were already posted but wanted to get a bit more advice.

I've just recently got a heat press - https://www.xpres.co.uk/p-7924-swing-heat-press-20-x-15.aspx and i am doing local football (soccer) team attire based on my contacts with family.

The logo's for the team are embroidered patches from China and it's just a simple logo to garment process.

The problem i'm having is that i haven't been told the settings for different fabrics so it's just a try and fail system but the bigger problem i have is that i haven't got that much stock to keep trying.

The vast majority are polyester and i'm getting the problem of the square/rectangle shape on the shirts when pressed.

The temperature i have been using is 150c (300 degrees) for 20 seconds but no matter how high or low i go with both temperature and time it is still the same.

My question is to experienced heat pressers is if i am only using a small area (sports team logo size) on the shirt, should i get the similar size platen? Will this eradicate the shiny mark or will it just reduce it?

Any help appreciated and also on any temperature/time settings.:)
 

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I think you are asking too many questions in one post. For patches they normally have a glue on the back but may not be perm. you should sew those around the edge. Because you are pressing on poly shirts, a cover like a teflon or silicon sheet might help as well as a teflon pillow.

Pictures would help with what you are doing and what you are getting in results.
 

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Perhaps you could try a low tack tape to hold the emblem to the garment and also tape something on top of the emblem (like a piece of old mouse mat or similar) then turn the garment inside out for pressing. The mouse mat will create a space/void for the surrounding material to fall into. This will also provide a more direct & even transfer of heat to the glue & garment.

As Binki says, sewing as well is probably mandatory for a long term solution.
 

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It is unclear to me if you are doing a heat transfer or a sewn on patch.
It is unclear to me if the decor has a adhesive that needs to be heat cured to the substrate.
I would suggest viewing the videos on Stahls to find some clues to what you may need. They have a good materials guide and may provide alternatives to the Great Chinese Unknown.
Stahls.com/help-education
 
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